Session Title

Incarceration in the Fourteenth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Aleksandra Pfau, Wendy J. Turner

Organizer Affiliation

Hendrix College, Georgia Regents Univ.

Presider Name

William H. York

Presider Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Paper Title 1

"Inside a Most Fortified Little House": Communities and the Imprisonment of the Senseless in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Presenter 1 Name

Leigh Ann Craig

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

Paper Title 2

Handcuffs, Chains, and Ropes: Medieval English Restraint and Incarceration of the Mentally Afflicted

Presenter 2 Name

Wendy J. Turner

Paper Title 3

"In Danger of Losing my Life": Prison as Punishment in French Remission Letters

Presenter 3 Name

Aleksandra Pfau

Start Date

16-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

Recent scholarship on the many forms of incarceration in the Middle Ages has begun to complicate the notion that the prison is an inherently modern phenomenon. There were a wide variety of methods for limiting people's mobility in the Middle Ages with a multiplicity of purposes. This session will examine some of these different types of medieval incarceration, whether of the criminal, the captive, the religious, or the insane, considering how medieval people understood incarceration both as a concrete experience and as a metaphor.

Aleksandra Pfau

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May 16th, 10:00 AM

Incarceration in the Fourteenth Century

Fetzer 1045

Recent scholarship on the many forms of incarceration in the Middle Ages has begun to complicate the notion that the prison is an inherently modern phenomenon. There were a wide variety of methods for limiting people's mobility in the Middle Ages with a multiplicity of purposes. This session will examine some of these different types of medieval incarceration, whether of the criminal, the captive, the religious, or the insane, considering how medieval people understood incarceration both as a concrete experience and as a metaphor.

Aleksandra Pfau