Session Title

Medieval Propaganda: Its Forms and Functions

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Noelle Phillips

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Presider Name

Noelle Phillips

Paper Title 1

Wycliffe in a Letter: Refashioning the Voice of Dissent in Fifteenth-Century England

Presenter 1 Name

M. Breann Leake

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Connecticut

Paper Title 2

Duke Humphrey and Rylands MS French 54: Lancastrian Uses of Space in Propaganda

Presenter 2 Name

Raluca Radulescu

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Bangor Univ.

Paper Title 3

Peerless Pageant or PR Pageant? Art and Propaganda in Anne Boleyn's Coronation Pageant

Presenter 3 Name

Sarah Crover

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Start Date

16-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 159

Description

Early forms of propaganda have, historically, been underanalyzed in criticism, mainly because propaganda is often seen as a blunt tool with no real nuance and little to no literary value. It is considered utilitarian rather than artistic, and may seem a product of selfishness or greed rather than a work produced by an "Author" or artist. Papers in this session will demonstrate the value of more comprehensive analysis of the literature of propaganda in the Middle Ages, whether in the form of books, poems, broadsides, or other manifestations. Propaganda often had a much wider cultural function than simply shoring up the perspective of a monarch, aristocrat, or civic leader. The codicological context in which we find propagandistic literature, the scribal emendations and transmission of the text, the historical content in the poetry itself, and even the later reception of such literature can all be fruitful avenues of inquiry into the significance of propaganda in the medieval and early modern period.

Noelle Phillips

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May 16th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Propaganda: Its Forms and Functions

Bernhard 159

Early forms of propaganda have, historically, been underanalyzed in criticism, mainly because propaganda is often seen as a blunt tool with no real nuance and little to no literary value. It is considered utilitarian rather than artistic, and may seem a product of selfishness or greed rather than a work produced by an "Author" or artist. Papers in this session will demonstrate the value of more comprehensive analysis of the literature of propaganda in the Middle Ages, whether in the form of books, poems, broadsides, or other manifestations. Propaganda often had a much wider cultural function than simply shoring up the perspective of a monarch, aristocrat, or civic leader. The codicological context in which we find propagandistic literature, the scribal emendations and transmission of the text, the historical content in the poetry itself, and even the later reception of such literature can all be fruitful avenues of inquiry into the significance of propaganda in the medieval and early modern period.

Noelle Phillips