Session Title

God, Nation, Text: Religion and Identity in Seventh-Century Gaul and the Isles

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Seventh Century Studies Network

Organizer Name

Thomas J. MacMaster

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Edinburgh

Presider Name

Thomas J. MacMaster

Paper Title 1

Pagan Forefathers and Christian Identities in Seventh-Century Irish Hagiography

Presenter 1 Name

Katja Ritari

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Helsingin Yliopisto

Paper Title 2

Aldhelm and Anglo-Saxon Identity

Presenter 2 Name

Michael Moises Garcia

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

"Numquam Tu, Romane": The Life of Eligius on Roman Identity in Seventh-Century Francia

Presenter 3 Name

Erica Buchberger

Presenter 3 Affiliation

College of Charleston

Paper Title 4

"Render unto Caesar": The Saint and the World in Seventh-Century Gaul

Presenter 4 Name

Nancy M. Thompson

Presenter 4 Affiliation

California State Univ.-East Bay

Start Date

16-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Whether approached from what had gone before or what was to come after, the seventh century fits awkwardly into schemes of what is antique and what is medieval. It is an era filled with endings and beginnings, where, often, discontinuity overwhelms any sense of gradual transformation. Perhaps due to this overwhelming sense of liminality, discussion of the seventh century has often been sidestepped, with the period either serving as an end or a beginning point rather than a period of continuity even in some of the most careful scholarship.

In this session, questions will be asked (and hopefully answered) regarding the ways of which seventh century people imagined themselves in relation to their pasts and to their presents. Each paper will examine texts to understand how ethnicity and other forms of identity informed their world.

Thomas J. MacMaster

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May 16th, 10:00 AM

God, Nation, Text: Religion and Identity in Seventh-Century Gaul and the Isles

Bernhard 204

Whether approached from what had gone before or what was to come after, the seventh century fits awkwardly into schemes of what is antique and what is medieval. It is an era filled with endings and beginnings, where, often, discontinuity overwhelms any sense of gradual transformation. Perhaps due to this overwhelming sense of liminality, discussion of the seventh century has often been sidestepped, with the period either serving as an end or a beginning point rather than a period of continuity even in some of the most careful scholarship.

In this session, questions will be asked (and hopefully answered) regarding the ways of which seventh century people imagined themselves in relation to their pasts and to their presents. Each paper will examine texts to understand how ethnicity and other forms of identity informed their world.

Thomas J. MacMaster