Session Title

Sadomasochism as a Premodern Practice?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages (SSHMA)

Organizer Name

Graham N. Drake, Lochin Brouillard

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo, Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Lochin Brouillard

Paper Title 1

Nightmares as Phantasies and Pain as Pleasure in Pieces of Medieval Poetry? Re-challenging Monk of Evensham's Vision and William Dunbar's Dance of the Seven Deadly Sins

Presenter 1 Name

Tom Linkinen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Turun Yliopisto

Paper Title 2

Margery Kempe and BDSM: Masochist Submission to Christ

Presenter 2 Name

Nicole Slipp

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Queen's Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Bædling: The Pre-modern Submissive?

Presenter 3 Name

Christopher Vaccaro

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Vermont

Start Date

16-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

This session examines the relationship between the giving and receiving of pleasure and pain in medieval discourses and practices. Martyrs braving their tormentors, knights bearing humiliation for their beloved, and ascetics engaged in self-mortification figure in the attempt problematize the representation of pleasurable pain or painful pleasure in the Middle Ages. Related work by medievalists (Robert Mills, Karmen MacKendrick) sheds light on many premodern notions and practices that relate to and complicate modern sexuality. This session invites explorations in history, literature, art history, and theology to reflect on medieval conceptions and performances of pain and pleasure.

Graham N. Drake

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May 16th, 10:00 AM

Sadomasochism as a Premodern Practice?

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

This session examines the relationship between the giving and receiving of pleasure and pain in medieval discourses and practices. Martyrs braving their tormentors, knights bearing humiliation for their beloved, and ascetics engaged in self-mortification figure in the attempt problematize the representation of pleasurable pain or painful pleasure in the Middle Ages. Related work by medievalists (Robert Mills, Karmen MacKendrick) sheds light on many premodern notions and practices that relate to and complicate modern sexuality. This session invites explorations in history, literature, art history, and theology to reflect on medieval conceptions and performances of pain and pleasure.

Graham N. Drake