Session Title

Late Antiquity and the New Humanities (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Heidi Marx-Wolf

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Manitoba

Presider Name

Heidi Marx-Wolf

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Philip Rousseau

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Catholic Univ. of America

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Anthony Kaldellis

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Mira Balberg

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Northwestern Univ.

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Ellen Muehlberger

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Catherine Chin

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Davis

Start Date

16-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley II Garneau 205

Description

This panel will explore what has changed since the emergence of "late antiquity" as a field of study with which scholars identify. Panelists will offer critical reflections on the growth of late antiquity as an identifiable scholarly field, on its origins or its boundaries (both explicit and implicit), and on its future. Because the emergence of late antiquity in the last fifty years owes a great deal to scholars who chose to step outside the boundaries of their disciplines—into cultural studies, or anthropology, or political science—panelists will also reflect on the study of late antiquity in the context of what some call "the new humanities," meaning the expanding range of analog and digital approaches and methodologies available to humanists. Panelists will attempt to gauge the state of late ancient studies as a whole, as well as the increasing collaboration between those scholars of late antiquity who study texts and those who work in material culture. Finally, panelists will also discuss best strategies for teaching late ancient materials. Topics covered by panelists will include: periodization (for instance, late antiquity, the post-classical and early medieval worlds), geographic designations (for instance, Byzantium, the West, and the East), research methods, the place of Jewish history and Rabbinic texts in late ancient studies, and novel approaches to doing history in this period (for instance, speculative fiction as history writing).

Heidi Marx-Wolf

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May 16th, 1:30 PM

Late Antiquity and the New Humanities (A Roundtable)

Valley II Garneau 205

This panel will explore what has changed since the emergence of "late antiquity" as a field of study with which scholars identify. Panelists will offer critical reflections on the growth of late antiquity as an identifiable scholarly field, on its origins or its boundaries (both explicit and implicit), and on its future. Because the emergence of late antiquity in the last fifty years owes a great deal to scholars who chose to step outside the boundaries of their disciplines—into cultural studies, or anthropology, or political science—panelists will also reflect on the study of late antiquity in the context of what some call "the new humanities," meaning the expanding range of analog and digital approaches and methodologies available to humanists. Panelists will attempt to gauge the state of late ancient studies as a whole, as well as the increasing collaboration between those scholars of late antiquity who study texts and those who work in material culture. Finally, panelists will also discuss best strategies for teaching late ancient materials. Topics covered by panelists will include: periodization (for instance, late antiquity, the post-classical and early medieval worlds), geographic designations (for instance, Byzantium, the West, and the East), research methods, the place of Jewish history and Rabbinic texts in late ancient studies, and novel approaches to doing history in this period (for instance, speculative fiction as history writing).

Heidi Marx-Wolf