Session Title

Students' Texts Are in Their Pockets: Does That Make a Difference?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Chaucer MetaPage

Organizer Name

Susan Yager

Organizer Affiliation

Iowa State Univ.

Presider Name

Susan Yager

Paper Title 1

Intrusive Technology in the Classroom or the Friend to Codicology

Presenter 1 Name

Michael Crafton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of West Georgia

Paper Title 2

Being on the Same Page: Using DIY E-books in Literature Classes

Presenter 2 Name

Vaughn Stewart

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Paper Title 3

Building a Reader's Text of the Canterbury Tales

Presenter 3 Name

Barbara Bordalejo

Presenter 3 Affiliation

KU Leuven

Start Date

16-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

This Chaucer MetaPage-sponsored session explores the pedagogical possibilities and challenges of students’ near-constant connection to the Internet. The speaker will discuss ways that digitized editions of medieval texts help make students aware of those texts’ decentralized nature; how students fluent in multi-modality can move easily between print and electronic text; and the development of a mobile application that delivers a reader’s text of the Canterbury Tales. In their entirety, the papers will demonstrate, and advocate for, ways that digital access can help students imagine the past.

Susan Yager

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May 16th, 1:30 PM

Students' Texts Are in Their Pockets: Does That Make a Difference?

Fetzer 1005

This Chaucer MetaPage-sponsored session explores the pedagogical possibilities and challenges of students’ near-constant connection to the Internet. The speaker will discuss ways that digitized editions of medieval texts help make students aware of those texts’ decentralized nature; how students fluent in multi-modality can move easily between print and electronic text; and the development of a mobile application that delivers a reader’s text of the Canterbury Tales. In their entirety, the papers will demonstrate, and advocate for, ways that digital access can help students imagine the past.

Susan Yager