Session Title

Magna Carta in Context

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Univ. of East Anglia

Organizer Name

Stephen Church

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of East Anglia

Presider Name

David Crouch

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Hull

Paper Title 1

Magna Carta and the Context of Peacemaking between King and Subjects

Presenter 1 Name

Stephen Church

Paper Title 2

Magna Carta and Excommunication

Presenter 2 Name

Felicity Hill

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of East Anglia

Paper Title 3

King John and Baronial Liberties in Ireland

Presenter 3 Name

Colin Veach

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Hull

Start Date

14-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1710

Description

The 800th anniversary of the concession of the terms of Magna Carta provides an ideal opportunity to revisit the creation of this signal document in world history. Enscribed by UNESCO as a world heritage document, Magna Carta has had a profound effect on the constitutional development of not just Britian but also on the many democratic societies around the world, including the United States. But Magna Carta was not created ex nihilo. Instead, it was the culmination of a long dialogue between king and subjects in medieval England, set against the backdrop of refining attitudes towards good governance in medieval Western Europe. To truly understand the significance of this landmark document, one must fully appreciate the circumstances of its creation.

The proposal is to gather together a group of scholars reassess the creation and context of Magna Carta. While many scholars will be thinking about Magna Carta in this year, we think that our proposal stands out because it is based on seeing Magna Carta in its context, not just in its immediate context of the reign of King John, but in the wider context of British and European history of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Stephen Church

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May 14th, 10:00 AM

Magna Carta in Context

Sangren 1710

The 800th anniversary of the concession of the terms of Magna Carta provides an ideal opportunity to revisit the creation of this signal document in world history. Enscribed by UNESCO as a world heritage document, Magna Carta has had a profound effect on the constitutional development of not just Britian but also on the many democratic societies around the world, including the United States. But Magna Carta was not created ex nihilo. Instead, it was the culmination of a long dialogue between king and subjects in medieval England, set against the backdrop of refining attitudes towards good governance in medieval Western Europe. To truly understand the significance of this landmark document, one must fully appreciate the circumstances of its creation.

The proposal is to gather together a group of scholars reassess the creation and context of Magna Carta. While many scholars will be thinking about Magna Carta in this year, we think that our proposal stands out because it is based on seeing Magna Carta in its context, not just in its immediate context of the reign of King John, but in the wider context of British and European history of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Stephen Church