Session Title

Religious Persecution and Heretical Identities in Medieval Europe

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Eugene Smelyansky

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Irvine

Presider Name

Mark Gregory Pegg

Presider Affiliation

Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Paper Title 1

Violence and the Construction of the Heretical Identity in the Cistercian Anti-Heretical Discourse

Presenter 1 Name

Stamatia Noutsou

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Masarykova Univ.

Paper Title 2

Shaping Behavior as Text: A Thirteenth-Century Inquisitors' Manual and the Persecution of Heresy in Languedoc

Presenter 2 Name

Melissa Bruninga-Matteau

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Martin Methodist College

Paper Title 3

Heretics, Informants, Priests: Conversion, Information, and Persecution of Heresy, 1391-1403

Presenter 3 Name

Eugene Smelyansky

Start Date

16-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

The session examines formation and negotiation of heretical identities in the process of religious persecution in medieval Europe over the course of two centuries (13th-14th). This topic is approached from a number of perspectives, from an analysis of Cistercian attitudes towards violent persecution of heretics; to way thirteenth-century inquisitorial manuals understood heresy; to the formation of networks of inquisitors, bishops, informants, and former heretics that allowed for an intensified persecution of Waldensians in the German-speaking lands at the end of the fourteenth century.

Eugene Smelyansky

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May 16th, 1:30 PM

Religious Persecution and Heretical Identities in Medieval Europe

Schneider 1245

The session examines formation and negotiation of heretical identities in the process of religious persecution in medieval Europe over the course of two centuries (13th-14th). This topic is approached from a number of perspectives, from an analysis of Cistercian attitudes towards violent persecution of heretics; to way thirteenth-century inquisitorial manuals understood heresy; to the formation of networks of inquisitors, bishops, informants, and former heretics that allowed for an intensified persecution of Waldensians in the German-speaking lands at the end of the fourteenth century.

Eugene Smelyansky