Session Title

Evidence of Bodies in Medieval and Renaissance England: Wombs, Wounds, and Words I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association

Organizer Name

Jennifer McNabb

Organizer Affiliation

Western Illinois Univ.

Presider Name

Thomas P. Klein

Presider Affiliation

Idaho State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Dismemberment as Judicial Punishment in Tenth- to Twelfth-Century England: An Examination of the Changing Practices of Decapitation, the Removal of Limbs, and Castration across the Norman Conquest

Presenter 1 Name

Alyxandra Mattison

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Sheffield

Paper Title 2

Bringing Up the Bodies: Evidence in Late Medieval and Renaissance English Church Courts

Presenter 2 Name

Jennifer McNabb

Paper Title 3

Bodies of Evidence: Relieving Wounded Soldiers in Early Modern England

Presenter 3 Name

Abby E. Lagemann

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Colorado-Boulder

Start Date

16-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

A pair of sessions sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA) takes as their focus the role played by the body as an historical and historicized category of evidence in a variety of medieval and early modern texts. In this session, historical documents illuminate the ways in which the body served as a locus of intense social, sexual, and legal anxieties. These records from medieval and Renaissance England reveal the body as both a physical reality and a theoretical concept, subject to continual contestation and redefinition.

J. McNabb

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May 16th, 1:30 PM

Evidence of Bodies in Medieval and Renaissance England: Wombs, Wounds, and Words I

Schneider 1280

A pair of sessions sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA) takes as their focus the role played by the body as an historical and historicized category of evidence in a variety of medieval and early modern texts. In this session, historical documents illuminate the ways in which the body served as a locus of intense social, sexual, and legal anxieties. These records from medieval and Renaissance England reveal the body as both a physical reality and a theoretical concept, subject to continual contestation and redefinition.

J. McNabb