Session Title

Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Society

Sponsoring Organization(s)

History Program, Texas A&M Univ.-Texarkana

Organizer Name

Craig M. Nakashian

Organizer Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.-Texarkana

Presider Name

Craig M. Nakashian

Paper Title 1

Chivalrous Violence in Medievalized Antiquity: Turnus versus Eneas in Heinrich von Veldeke's Eneasroman (ca. 1184)

Presenter 1 Name

Jonathan S. Martin

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Necessity of Violence in Chivalric Society

Presenter 2 Name

Courtney Hubbart

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 3

Chivalric Chaos and Order in The Franklin’s Tale

Presenter 3 Name

Lance Martin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 4

A Soothing Holy War: Chivalric Ideology and Castile's Granada Policy at the Turn of the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 4 Name

Sam Claussen

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester

Start Date

16-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

Chivalry is one of the most recognizable aspects of the medieval world, and has attracted scholarly (and non-scholarly) interest for decades. Knighthood, knightly violence, and its effects on public order is of interest to scholars of society, culture, governance, and warfare. The knightly ethos and identity (and its concomitant questions surrounding masculinity) played a major role in governance, warfare, public violence, feud, and the construction of gender. These interdisciplinary sessions will bring together scholars from history, literature, religion, and art (and other affiliated fields) to investigate these questions. In addition to investigating these topics, the panels will demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary discussions among scholars of different disciplines.

Craig M. Nakashian

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May 16th, 1:30 PM

Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Society

Bernhard 211

Chivalry is one of the most recognizable aspects of the medieval world, and has attracted scholarly (and non-scholarly) interest for decades. Knighthood, knightly violence, and its effects on public order is of interest to scholars of society, culture, governance, and warfare. The knightly ethos and identity (and its concomitant questions surrounding masculinity) played a major role in governance, warfare, public violence, feud, and the construction of gender. These interdisciplinary sessions will bring together scholars from history, literature, religion, and art (and other affiliated fields) to investigate these questions. In addition to investigating these topics, the panels will demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary discussions among scholars of different disciplines.

Craig M. Nakashian