Session Title

Rethinking Medieval Maps

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Laura Julinda Whatley, Chet Van Duzer

Organizer Affiliation

Ferris State Univ., Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Laura Julinda Whatley

Paper Title 1

Eating the Edge of the World in Book Eleven of the Christian Topography

Presenter 1 Name

Rebecca Darley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Warburg Institute, Univ. of London

Paper Title 2

Exceeding Expectations: Appeasement and Subversion in the Catalan Atlas (1375)

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas Franke

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Paper Title 3

A Neglected Type of Mappamundi and Its Re-imagining in the Mare historiarum (BnF MS lat. 4915, f. 26v)

Presenter 3 Name

Chet Van Duzer

Paper Title 4

Rethinking Maps in Late Medieval Italy: Giusto de' Menabuoi's Creation of the World in the Baptistery of Padua

Presenter 4 Name

Anne Derbes

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Hood College

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

P.D.A. Harvey has written that “Medieval Europe was a society that functioned largely without maps”—and this session takes this statement as a call for a closer look at how medieval Europeans engaged with maps when they did resort to them. What evidence do we have, either from maps themselves, their contexts, or from textual sources, about how medieval maps were used? What about cases in which maps were designed for one purpose, but employed for another? What do these uses and re-uses tell us about the place of maps in medieval society, and their connection with broader developments in visual or material culture?

Laura Julinda Whatley

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Rethinking Medieval Maps

Fetzer 2040

P.D.A. Harvey has written that “Medieval Europe was a society that functioned largely without maps”—and this session takes this statement as a call for a closer look at how medieval Europeans engaged with maps when they did resort to them. What evidence do we have, either from maps themselves, their contexts, or from textual sources, about how medieval maps were used? What about cases in which maps were designed for one purpose, but employed for another? What do these uses and re-uses tell us about the place of maps in medieval society, and their connection with broader developments in visual or material culture?

Laura Julinda Whatley