Session Title

Object Iterations

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Luke A. Fidler

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Luke A. Fidler, Julia Oswald, Scott Miller

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago, Northwestern Univ., Northwestern Univ.

Paper Title 1

Image-Being: The Poliorcetica and the Ontography of Images

Presenter 1 Name

Roland Betancourt

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Irvine

Paper Title 2

Realia in Reliquaries: The Rhetoric of Material Presentation in Scenic Reliquaries, ca. 1300

Presenter 2 Name

Sarah M. Guérin

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Montréal

Paper Title 3

Reading Things in Medieval Rome

Presenter 3 Name

Erik Inglis

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Oberlin College

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Beate Fricke

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

An opening from a later medieval ivory devotional booklet presents the Arma Christi, the “weapons of Christ” or the instruments of his passion. Decontextualized from the Calvary narrative and set against the monochromatic ivory backdrop, the objects assume an efficacy of their own even as they appear oddly strewn and scaled across the page. Like other medieval things—including imaginary and re-visioned objects—the Arma Christi formed a continuum of animacy that, as Caroline Walker Bynum recently noted, blurred the borders between human fabrications, found objects, and medieval subjects. Imago and res intersected both at the level of material mediation and in the content of depiction. Attending to recent object-based methodologies in Medieval Studies (e.g. the material turn, thing theory, object-oriented ontology), this panel seeks to probe the ways in which re-presentation facilitated dialogue between objects and beholders.

Luke A. Fidler

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Object Iterations

Schneider 1140

An opening from a later medieval ivory devotional booklet presents the Arma Christi, the “weapons of Christ” or the instruments of his passion. Decontextualized from the Calvary narrative and set against the monochromatic ivory backdrop, the objects assume an efficacy of their own even as they appear oddly strewn and scaled across the page. Like other medieval things—including imaginary and re-visioned objects—the Arma Christi formed a continuum of animacy that, as Caroline Walker Bynum recently noted, blurred the borders between human fabrications, found objects, and medieval subjects. Imago and res intersected both at the level of material mediation and in the content of depiction. Attending to recent object-based methodologies in Medieval Studies (e.g. the material turn, thing theory, object-oriented ontology), this panel seeks to probe the ways in which re-presentation facilitated dialogue between objects and beholders.

Luke A. Fidler