Session Title

Evidence of Bodies in Medieval and Renaissance England: Wombs, Wounds, and Words II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association

Organizer Name

Jennifer McNabb

Organizer Affiliation

Western Illinois Univ.

Presider Name

Jennifer McNabb

Paper Title 1

Troilus's Wounded Heart: Blood and Phlebotomy Metaphors in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde

Presenter 1 Name

Rachel Levinson-Emley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Paper Title 2

The Maternal Anxiety of Chaucer's Prioress

Presenter 2 Name

Samantha Demmerle

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 3

Women's Bodies as Evidence: Somatic Anxiety surrounding the Uterus and Vagina in the High Middle Ages

Presenter 3 Name

Ginger L. Smoak

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Utah

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

A pair of sessions sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA) takes as their focus the role played by the body as an historical and historicized category of evidence in a variety of medieval and early modern texts. In this session, literary texts and methods illuminate the ways in which the body served as a locus of intense social, sexual, and legal anxieties. These records from medieval and Renaissance England reveal the body as both a physical reality and a theoretical concept, subject to continual contestation and redefinition.

J. McNabb

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Evidence of Bodies in Medieval and Renaissance England: Wombs, Wounds, and Words II

Schneider 1280

A pair of sessions sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA) takes as their focus the role played by the body as an historical and historicized category of evidence in a variety of medieval and early modern texts. In this session, literary texts and methods illuminate the ways in which the body served as a locus of intense social, sexual, and legal anxieties. These records from medieval and Renaissance England reveal the body as both a physical reality and a theoretical concept, subject to continual contestation and redefinition.

J. McNabb