Session Title

Piracy's Effect on Trade throughout the Medieval Mediterranean: In Memory of Olivia Remie Constable's Scholarship on Intercultural Contacts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Eleanor A. Congdon

Organizer Affiliation

Youngstown State Univ.

Presider Name

William Chester Jordan

Presider Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 1

Piracy in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea

Presenter 1 Name

Elisaveta Todorova

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Cincinnati

Paper Title 2

Held To Account: Medieval Scribes at Sea

Presenter 2 Name

Emily Sohmer Tai

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Queensborough Community College, CUNY

Paper Title 3

Straw-Men, Hidden Pouches, and Fake Pirate Attacks: Merchant Responses to the Threat of Piracy

Presenter 3 Name

Eleanor A. Congdon

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

Piracy throughout the Medieval Mediterranean can be studied from two vantage points: a) the mariners who stole and their victims, b) and the merchants trying to move cargoes to the ultimate point of distribution. This session looks at examples of piracy from both approaches. It is meant to emphasize the inter-connectedness of transport, commerce, violence, political identification, religious identification, and simple lust for quick gain. It is meant to show the commonality of the maritime experience, including the calculated risks or precautions all merchants had to factor into transporting goods by sea. It is not meant to exclude warfare, but rather to show how it is related to commerce and vice versa. Wherever ships transported goods, there also were occasional predators who, seeing an opportunity, looked to seize a cargo, both for the goods and people whose sale could bring a profit. Some of these aggressors merely made good on a random opportunity. Others hunted quarry based on the owner’s religion. Still others attacked passing vessels on the basis of the crew’s or the cargo’s nationality. Some hunted alone, while others took large numbers of ships to attack ports of another faith.

This session is presented in honor of Olivia Remie Constable's life and research. Her scholarship led a new generation of scholars to approach the Mediterranean as a place of tremendous intercultural contact. This approach recognizes the different approaches to trade by different nations, and the differences caused by the differences between the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths in conducting trade. -- EACongdon

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Piracy's Effect on Trade throughout the Medieval Mediterranean: In Memory of Olivia Remie Constable's Scholarship on Intercultural Contacts

Schneider 1325

Piracy throughout the Medieval Mediterranean can be studied from two vantage points: a) the mariners who stole and their victims, b) and the merchants trying to move cargoes to the ultimate point of distribution. This session looks at examples of piracy from both approaches. It is meant to emphasize the inter-connectedness of transport, commerce, violence, political identification, religious identification, and simple lust for quick gain. It is meant to show the commonality of the maritime experience, including the calculated risks or precautions all merchants had to factor into transporting goods by sea. It is not meant to exclude warfare, but rather to show how it is related to commerce and vice versa. Wherever ships transported goods, there also were occasional predators who, seeing an opportunity, looked to seize a cargo, both for the goods and people whose sale could bring a profit. Some of these aggressors merely made good on a random opportunity. Others hunted quarry based on the owner’s religion. Still others attacked passing vessels on the basis of the crew’s or the cargo’s nationality. Some hunted alone, while others took large numbers of ships to attack ports of another faith.

This session is presented in honor of Olivia Remie Constable's life and research. Her scholarship led a new generation of scholars to approach the Mediterranean as a place of tremendous intercultural contact. This approach recognizes the different approaches to trade by different nations, and the differences caused by the differences between the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths in conducting trade. -- EACongdon