Session Title

The Scottish Makars

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Ruth Oldman

Organizer Affiliation

Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

Presider Name

Ruth Oldman

Paper Title 1

Rhetorical Ductus and Middle Scots Aesthetics

Presenter 1 Name

R. James Goldstein

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Aureate Turn and Counter-Diction: Political Implications of Poetic Language from Lydgate to Dunbar

Presenter 2 Name

David Hadbawnik

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. at Buffalo

Paper Title 3

The Makar and the "Ladeis Fair": William Dunbar and the Querelle des Femmes

Presenter 3 Name

Lucy R. Hinnie

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Edinburgh

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

Scottish literature is not often considered when studying the later medieval and early modern eras. When it is, select poems by specific poets--such as Robert Henryson or William Dunbar--are chosen to represent an entire dynamic and rich literary tradition. Much of the focus on these authors stems from the understanding they are "Scottish Chaucerians" and their works pay a great debt to the poetic style and influence of Geoffrey Chaucer. This term is limiting, however, as it defines the anthology of these "makars" as extensions of Chaucer's literary style. Much research has also been attributed to the nationalistic fervor of the makars. Understanding the patriotic nature of their works is critical when studying these Scottish authors as it is a common thread in literature, history, politics, and culture. This has also become a recurring theme in scholarly research, however, and has become a common purview when considering these works.

This session is designed to allow scholars to explore the contributions of these Scottish makars outside of the aforementioned realms. Although it is important to recognize these makars as nationalistic and influenced by Chaucer, it is also necessary to branch out from these two dominant scopes of study. The works of the makars can be examined through multiple theoretical and structural lenses, providing rich commentaries on Scottish society and contributing artistically to the medieval literary tradition.

Ruth M.E. Oldman

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 3:30 PM

The Scottish Makars

Schneider 1355

Scottish literature is not often considered when studying the later medieval and early modern eras. When it is, select poems by specific poets--such as Robert Henryson or William Dunbar--are chosen to represent an entire dynamic and rich literary tradition. Much of the focus on these authors stems from the understanding they are "Scottish Chaucerians" and their works pay a great debt to the poetic style and influence of Geoffrey Chaucer. This term is limiting, however, as it defines the anthology of these "makars" as extensions of Chaucer's literary style. Much research has also been attributed to the nationalistic fervor of the makars. Understanding the patriotic nature of their works is critical when studying these Scottish authors as it is a common thread in literature, history, politics, and culture. This has also become a recurring theme in scholarly research, however, and has become a common purview when considering these works.

This session is designed to allow scholars to explore the contributions of these Scottish makars outside of the aforementioned realms. Although it is important to recognize these makars as nationalistic and influenced by Chaucer, it is also necessary to branch out from these two dominant scopes of study. The works of the makars can be examined through multiple theoretical and structural lenses, providing rich commentaries on Scottish society and contributing artistically to the medieval literary tradition.

Ruth M.E. Oldman