Session Title

Blurring the Boundaries in Medieval Literature: Bodies, Species, Texts, and Objects

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lydia Zeldenrust

Organizer Affiliation

Queen Mary, Univ. of London

Presider Name

Hetta Howes

Presider Affiliation

Queen Mary, Univ. of London

Paper Title 1

"And any part of my body or spirit that may be turned aright": Blurred Boundaries of Heart and Mind in Old English Poetry

Presenter 1 Name

Hana Videen (Tashjian Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies, King's College London

Paper Title 2

Sensing Transformations between Human, Stone, and Ivory in William Caxton's Book of Ovyde Named Methamorphose

Presenter 2 Name

Sophia Wilson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 3

Mutations of a Half-Serpent: How the Legend of Mélusine traveled around Western Europe

Presenter 3 Name

Lydia Zeldenrust

Paper Title 4

Glosses, Inscriptions, and the Cultural Lives of Manuscripts: The Paratexts of Arthurian Literature Owned by Fifteenth-Century Women

Presenter 4 Name

Rebecca Lyons

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

This session looks at various examples of 'blurred boundaries' in medieval literature, including the boundary between humans and nonhumans, the limits or borders of the body, and the boundaries between regions, cultures, and languages. The papers also examine the blurring of readership and ownership, and even the boundary of the medieval period itself is questioned.

Lydia Zeldenrust

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 3:30 PM

Blurring the Boundaries in Medieval Literature: Bodies, Species, Texts, and Objects

Bernhard 106

This session looks at various examples of 'blurred boundaries' in medieval literature, including the boundary between humans and nonhumans, the limits or borders of the body, and the boundaries between regions, cultures, and languages. The papers also examine the blurring of readership and ownership, and even the boundary of the medieval period itself is questioned.

Lydia Zeldenrust