Session Title

Chivalry, Honor, and Martial Skill: Visual Displays of Power in the Later Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Leeds

Organizer Name

Audrey Thorstad

Organizer Affiliation

School of History, Univ. of Leeds

Presider Name

Kelly DeVries

Presider Affiliation

Loyola Univ. Maryland

Paper Title 1

A King's Mighty Weapon: The Iconography of Kings Holding Staff Weapons in the Late Middle Ages as a Reflection of the Changes in Warfare

Presenter 1 Name

Jason Tzouriadis

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Leeds

Paper Title 2

Chivalry, Martial Skill, and Visual Display in Malory’s Morte Darthur

Presenter 2 Name

Kevin S. Whetter

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Acadia Univ.

Paper Title 3

Pageantry and Power in the Tournaments of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I

Presenter 3 Name

Natalie Anderson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Leeds

Paper Title 4

Heraldic Display on the Castles of "New Men" in the Late Middle Ages

Presenter 4 Name

Audrey Thorstad

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Visual culture has long been the subject of research, particularly by art historians and historians who work with material culture. Surviving visual culture of the nobility in the later Middle Ages encompasses a range of material from buildings, weaponry, manuscripts, heraldry, and clothing. The nobility used these items as a means to display social distinction and to promote themselves within society. The scholarship on visual displays of power is across multiple – but separate – disciplines and fields. As a result, interdisciplinary conversations have been rare, leading to a disjointed set of research on the subject. And yet, visual representations of noble power were a prominent feature within noble society during the later Middle Ages.

This session will discuss a variety of media used by the nobility to display the idea of chivalry, honour, and martial skill. The papers will draw on a range of different disciplines and subjects, including architecture, material culture, art, and literature, focussing on key areas in England and mainland Europe. The session is aimed to encourage a more holistic view of visual culture and display, leading to a more inclusive perspective and encouraging future interdisciplinary and collaborations on the subject.

Axel E.W. Müller and Audrey Thorstad

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Chivalry, Honor, and Martial Skill: Visual Displays of Power in the Later Middle Ages

Bernhard 204

Visual culture has long been the subject of research, particularly by art historians and historians who work with material culture. Surviving visual culture of the nobility in the later Middle Ages encompasses a range of material from buildings, weaponry, manuscripts, heraldry, and clothing. The nobility used these items as a means to display social distinction and to promote themselves within society. The scholarship on visual displays of power is across multiple – but separate – disciplines and fields. As a result, interdisciplinary conversations have been rare, leading to a disjointed set of research on the subject. And yet, visual representations of noble power were a prominent feature within noble society during the later Middle Ages.

This session will discuss a variety of media used by the nobility to display the idea of chivalry, honour, and martial skill. The papers will draw on a range of different disciplines and subjects, including architecture, material culture, art, and literature, focussing on key areas in England and mainland Europe. The session is aimed to encourage a more holistic view of visual culture and display, leading to a more inclusive perspective and encouraging future interdisciplinary and collaborations on the subject.

Axel E.W. Müller and Audrey Thorstad