Session Title

Reading and Writing Jews and Judaism in Medieval French Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Matilda Tomaryn Bruckner

Organizer Affiliation

Boston College

Presider Name

Brian J. Reilly

Presider Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Encountering the Jew: Gautier de Coincy and Rutebeuf in Dialogue with the Legend of Theophile

Presenter 1 Name

Matilda Tomaryn Bruckner

Paper Title 2

An Unidentified Prose Romance Fragment: Beinecke Ms 918

Presenter 2 Name

Elizabeth K. Hebbard

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 3

Ancient Jewish History ca. 1400: Evidence from the French Royal and Ducal Libraries

Presenter 3 Name

Thelma Fenster

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 4

Hebrew Laments Commemorating Pastoureaux Violence in 1320

Presenter 4 Name

Susan Einbinder

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Connecticut

Start Date

16-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

For a long time the scholarly community has viewed the literature written in medieval France for secular audiences as confidently Christian in its ethos, allowing only for the expression, here and there, of overt anti-Jewish exclamations. More current research, however, teases out the less obvious ways in which the literature composed in medieval France anxiously interrogated its difference in the hope of formulating its own, separate specificity, whether from a Christian or Jewish perspective. (MTB/TF)

Matilda T. Bruckner

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May 16th, 3:30 PM

Reading and Writing Jews and Judaism in Medieval French Literature

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

For a long time the scholarly community has viewed the literature written in medieval France for secular audiences as confidently Christian in its ethos, allowing only for the expression, here and there, of overt anti-Jewish exclamations. More current research, however, teases out the less obvious ways in which the literature composed in medieval France anxiously interrogated its difference in the hope of formulating its own, separate specificity, whether from a Christian or Jewish perspective. (MTB/TF)

Matilda T. Bruckner