Session Title

(Im)materiality in English and Welsh Medieval Culture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Daniel Helbert

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Presider Name

Daniel Helbert

Paper Title 1

Wonders Taken for Signs: The Objects of Gerald's Itinerarium

Presenter 1 Name

Michael Faletra

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Reed College

Paper Title 2

Creating Historical Material: Monastic and Secular Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Wales

Presenter 2 Name

Owain Wyn Jones

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Bangor Univ.

Paper Title 3

Dancing on the Book: Materializing and Dematerializing in Anglo-Latin and Middle Welsh Texts

Presenter 3 Name

Siân Echard

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Start Date

17-5-2015 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

The recent trend in medieval literary studies to emphasize inanimate objects and materiality as a means of contextualizing or de-emphasizing human and humanist activities has encouraged two, perhaps unintended, consequences: 1) The segregation of 'Humanist' philosophical interpretations of the world and its contents/inhabitants (metaphysics, Marxism, psychoanalysis, etc.) from 'non-human' oriented epistemologies (Eco-Criticism, Object Oriented Ontology, etc.); and 2) the lack of distinguishment between human-inanimate object relationships within a culturally homogenous setting and human-inanimate object relationships within a culturally mixed setting.

This session on materiality and immateriality in Welsh and English culture hopes to reconstitute the severed links between human ideologies and non-human epistemologies with the medieval English and Welsh literary and cultural interactions as a focal point. How do we constitute and define identity in a colonial or mixed setting in relation to materiality (dirt, rocks, manuscripts, etc.) and/or immateriality (philosophy, ideology, hegemony, etc.)? Does non-human ontology contribute to colonial and post-colonial ethnic-nationalisms? Does the stigma of Matthew Arnold's Romantic (and flawed) depiction of "Nature Worshiping Celts" deter scholars from engaging in an eco-critical analysis of cross-cultural literature?

Daniel Helbert

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 8:30 AM

(Im)materiality in English and Welsh Medieval Culture

Fetzer 1045

The recent trend in medieval literary studies to emphasize inanimate objects and materiality as a means of contextualizing or de-emphasizing human and humanist activities has encouraged two, perhaps unintended, consequences: 1) The segregation of 'Humanist' philosophical interpretations of the world and its contents/inhabitants (metaphysics, Marxism, psychoanalysis, etc.) from 'non-human' oriented epistemologies (Eco-Criticism, Object Oriented Ontology, etc.); and 2) the lack of distinguishment between human-inanimate object relationships within a culturally homogenous setting and human-inanimate object relationships within a culturally mixed setting.

This session on materiality and immateriality in Welsh and English culture hopes to reconstitute the severed links between human ideologies and non-human epistemologies with the medieval English and Welsh literary and cultural interactions as a focal point. How do we constitute and define identity in a colonial or mixed setting in relation to materiality (dirt, rocks, manuscripts, etc.) and/or immateriality (philosophy, ideology, hegemony, etc.)? Does non-human ontology contribute to colonial and post-colonial ethnic-nationalisms? Does the stigma of Matthew Arnold's Romantic (and flawed) depiction of "Nature Worshiping Celts" deter scholars from engaging in an eco-critical analysis of cross-cultural literature?

Daniel Helbert