Session Title

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Rare Book Dept., The Free Library of Philadelphia

Organizer Name

Bert Beynen

Organizer Affiliation

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Temple Univ.

Presider Name

Bert Beynen

Paper Title 1

The Reorganization of Tense, Aspect, and Mood in Medieval Georgian

Presenter 1 Name

Rusudan Asatiani

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Biblical Narratives and the Descent of the Georgian and Armenian People

Presenter 2 Name

Manana Sanadze

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Georgia, Tbilisi

Paper Title 3

The Independence of Georgia during the Reign of Giorgi the Brilliant, 1299/1318-1346

Presenter 3 Name

Giuli Alasania

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Georgia, Tbilisi

Paper Title 4

Parallel Corpora of Georgian Medieval Texts

Presenter 4 Name

Nino Doborjginidze, Irina Lobzhanidze

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Ilia State Univ., Ilia State Univ.

Start Date

17-5-2015 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1125

Description

Professor Sanadze's paper gives an overview of Georgian and Armenian chronicles which connect the origin of their peoples to Biblical sources, whereas Professor Alasania describes how Giorgi V, the Brilliant, restored the Georgian Kingdom after its conquest by the Mongols. Professor Asatiani traces how Medieval Georgian changed from 13 to 11 screeves and offers some cognitive interpretation based on the changes of linguistic ‘world view.’ Professors Doborjginidze and Lobzhanidze discuss their parallel (Georgian-English) electronic corpus of Old Armenian and Georgian manuscripts, including Shota Rustaveli’s vepkhist’q’aosani . The latter includes 12 previously unknown manuscripts, as well as all hitherto studied materials.

Bert Beynen

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May 17th, 8:30 AM

The Cultures of Georgia and Armenia

Schneider 1125

Professor Sanadze's paper gives an overview of Georgian and Armenian chronicles which connect the origin of their peoples to Biblical sources, whereas Professor Alasania describes how Giorgi V, the Brilliant, restored the Georgian Kingdom after its conquest by the Mongols. Professor Asatiani traces how Medieval Georgian changed from 13 to 11 screeves and offers some cognitive interpretation based on the changes of linguistic ‘world view.’ Professors Doborjginidze and Lobzhanidze discuss their parallel (Georgian-English) electronic corpus of Old Armenian and Georgian manuscripts, including Shota Rustaveli’s vepkhist’q’aosani . The latter includes 12 previously unknown manuscripts, as well as all hitherto studied materials.

Bert Beynen