Session Title

Pathways to Power in Early Medieval Northern Europe I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Archaeology, Univ. of Aberdeen

Organizer Name

Karen Milek

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Aberdeen

Presider Name

Lisa Collinson

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Aberdeen

Paper Title 1

Early Medieval Lordship, Hierarchies, and Field-Systems in Scandinavia and the British Isles

Presenter 1 Name

Jan-Henrik Fallgren

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Aberdeen

Paper Title 2

State Formation within the Localities: A Comparative Approach to Land Management and Productive Processes in the Kingdoms of Brega (Ireland), Mercia (England), and Asturias-León (Northwest Spain)

Presenter 2 Name

Alvaro Carvajal-Castro

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. College Dublin

Paper Title 3

New Evidence for Emerging Power Structures in Northern Pictland

Presenter 3 Name

Óskar Sveinbjarnarson, Gordon Noble

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Aberdeen, Univ. of Aberdeen

Paper Title 4

A Household Perspective on State Formation in Medieval Iceland

Presenter 4 Name

Douglas Bolender

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Boston

Start Date

17-5-2015 8:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

The early medieval period was a watershed in northern Europe -- a time of fundamental changes in world views, political structures, and trade economies, which ultimately resulted in the emergence of new kingdoms in England, Scotland, Ireland, Frankia, Scandinavia and the Baltic region. An understanding of the transformations that irrevocably changed the political and economic landscape of northern Europe between the 6th and 12th centuries can only develop through the integration of a wide range of sources, yet it is rare for scholars from different specialisms to work together in a truly interdisciplinary environment. The Pathways to Power in Early Medieval Northern Europe sessions offer an opportunity for archaeologists, palaeoecologists, numismatists, historians, literary scholars, art historians and place-name specialists to meet and discuss how their research is illuminating the different ways in which the early medieval kingdoms of northern Europe developed: how power was negotiated and communicated, and how the emergence of kingdoms influenced literary cultures, art, lifeways, and relations with the land. It is hoped that the synergies produced by bringing together specialists from different disciplines, who are working on similar research questions but who normally attend different conferences, will expose scholars to ideas outside of their traditional intellectual boxes and lead to new collaborative initiatives that cross-cut disciplinary boundaries.

Karen Milek

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May 17th, 8:30 AM

Pathways to Power in Early Medieval Northern Europe I

Bernhard 209

The early medieval period was a watershed in northern Europe -- a time of fundamental changes in world views, political structures, and trade economies, which ultimately resulted in the emergence of new kingdoms in England, Scotland, Ireland, Frankia, Scandinavia and the Baltic region. An understanding of the transformations that irrevocably changed the political and economic landscape of northern Europe between the 6th and 12th centuries can only develop through the integration of a wide range of sources, yet it is rare for scholars from different specialisms to work together in a truly interdisciplinary environment. The Pathways to Power in Early Medieval Northern Europe sessions offer an opportunity for archaeologists, palaeoecologists, numismatists, historians, literary scholars, art historians and place-name specialists to meet and discuss how their research is illuminating the different ways in which the early medieval kingdoms of northern Europe developed: how power was negotiated and communicated, and how the emergence of kingdoms influenced literary cultures, art, lifeways, and relations with the land. It is hoped that the synergies produced by bringing together specialists from different disciplines, who are working on similar research questions but who normally attend different conferences, will expose scholars to ideas outside of their traditional intellectual boxes and lead to new collaborative initiatives that cross-cut disciplinary boundaries.

Karen Milek