Session Title

Moving Women, Moving Objects II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)

Organizer Name

Tracy Chapman Hamilton, Mariah Proctor-Tiffany

Organizer Affiliation

Sweet Briar College, California State Univ.-Long Beach

Presider Name

Tracy Chapman Hamilton, Mariah Proctor-Tiffany

Paper Title 1

Networks of Gold and Silver: The Collecting of Isabella of France

Presenter 1 Name

Anne Rudloff Stanton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 2

Women Collectors and Patrons: Toward a Cartography of Exchange in the Late Middle Ages

Presenter 2 Name

Diane Antille

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Neuchâtel

Paper Title 3

Empress Matilda and the Valasse Reliquary Cross: From the Holy Roman Empire to the Plantagenet Realm

Presenter 3 Name

Nicolas Hatot

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Musée des Antiquités, Rouen

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Joan A. Holladay

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Start Date

17-5-2015 10:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1220

Description

As we examine medieval works of art like manuscripts, reliquaries, and jewels, today anchored and spotlighted in their museum vitrines, it is easy to imagine these sumptuous objects at rest in the hands of their original owners. But, in truth, they were in constant motion, and women were especially responsible for the movement of these works of art.

This panel seeks to enrich the discussion of women and their relationships with their objects that, in the area of non-book arts, remains relatively unexplored. Luscious objects were gifts that traveled lesser and greater distances, some imported in brides’ nuptial coffers and many more commissioned and used to unite women separated by their politically advantageous marriages. Sisters and mothers, grandmothers and aunts, daughters and cousins, as well as friends and allies, all exchanged works of art with shared stories and iconographies. These pieces were the tokens that served as tribute, the centerpieces of rituals and ceremonies, the precious keepsakes enjoyed in intimate places, and the markers of architectural spaces often also founded or endowed by these women.

Mariah Proctor-Tiffany and Tracy Chapman Hamilton

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May 17th, 10:30 AM

Moving Women, Moving Objects II

Schneider 1220

As we examine medieval works of art like manuscripts, reliquaries, and jewels, today anchored and spotlighted in their museum vitrines, it is easy to imagine these sumptuous objects at rest in the hands of their original owners. But, in truth, they were in constant motion, and women were especially responsible for the movement of these works of art.

This panel seeks to enrich the discussion of women and their relationships with their objects that, in the area of non-book arts, remains relatively unexplored. Luscious objects were gifts that traveled lesser and greater distances, some imported in brides’ nuptial coffers and many more commissioned and used to unite women separated by their politically advantageous marriages. Sisters and mothers, grandmothers and aunts, daughters and cousins, as well as friends and allies, all exchanged works of art with shared stories and iconographies. These pieces were the tokens that served as tribute, the centerpieces of rituals and ceremonies, the precious keepsakes enjoyed in intimate places, and the markers of architectural spaces often also founded or endowed by these women.

Mariah Proctor-Tiffany and Tracy Chapman Hamilton