Session Title

Leadership Profiles in the Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Church

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Conventus: Problems of Religious Communal Life in the Central Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Steven Vanderputten

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. Gent

Presider Name

Steven Vanderputten

Paper Title 1

Leading by Example: Customaries and Abbatial Conversatio at Cluny in the Eleventh Century

Presenter 1 Name

Edmund McCaffray

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Arizona State Univ.

Paper Title 2

In the Teeth of Reform: Reprofiling the Catalan Episcopate around the Year 1000

Presenter 2 Name

Jonathan Jarrett

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Paper Title 3

Imitatio or Aemulatio? Developing New Forms of Episcopal Leadership in Eleventh-Century Lotharingian Contexts

Presenter 3 Name

Pieter Byttebier

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. Gent

Start Date

14-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 159

Description

This session aims to investigate the shaping of ecclesiastical and religious leadership profiles in the high Middle Ages. Expectations regarding the behavior and morality of abbots and bishops in particular were subject to continuous evolution, a process brought about by the confrontation of early medieval leadership models to new societal, intellectual, and religious impulses. Papers will address two key questions. First, how this process contributed to the emergence of new, broadly acknowledged profiles for the religious and ecclesiastical leadership, and how these can be identified through study of the primary evidence. And second, how religious and ecclesiastical leaders responded to these new profiles, and how these impacted on their perception of self, public behavior, and ongoing developments in leadership ideology.

Steven Vanderputten

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

Leadership Profiles in the Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Church

Bernhard 159

This session aims to investigate the shaping of ecclesiastical and religious leadership profiles in the high Middle Ages. Expectations regarding the behavior and morality of abbots and bishops in particular were subject to continuous evolution, a process brought about by the confrontation of early medieval leadership models to new societal, intellectual, and religious impulses. Papers will address two key questions. First, how this process contributed to the emergence of new, broadly acknowledged profiles for the religious and ecclesiastical leadership, and how these can be identified through study of the primary evidence. And second, how religious and ecclesiastical leaders responded to these new profiles, and how these impacted on their perception of self, public behavior, and ongoing developments in leadership ideology.

Steven Vanderputten