Session Title

Moving More Online: Strategies and Challenges for Using Technology in the "Classroom" (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Kate McGrath

Organizer Affiliation

Central Connecticut State Univ.

Presider Name

Kristine Larsen

Presider Affiliation

Central Connecticut State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

Kate McGrath

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas R. Leek

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Máire Johnson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Elizabethtown College

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Andrew Reeves

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Middle Georgia State College

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Valerie Dawn Hampton

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ./Univ. of Florida

Paper Title 6

Panelist

Presenter 6 Name

April Harper

Presenter 6 Affiliation

SUNY-Oneonta

Paper Title 7

Panelist

Presenter 7 Name

Nicole Lopez-Jantzen

Presenter 7 Affiliation

Queensborough Community College, CUNY

Start Date

14-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1730

Description

This will be a roundtable discussion of the growing use, and concerns with the use, of technology in the classroom. It will provide a balanced perspective on the development of new forms of pedagogy for teaching online classes.

There is a growing discussion among academics and the public about the appropriateness of online education for higher education. Much of this is centered on the declining public support for state funding of higher education institutions and the rising concern of the cost to college students. Online courses appear to many to be a possible solution, allowing for the education of more students with fewer faculty, especially fewer full-time faculty. At the same time, there are those in higher education who laud the pedagogical advancements offered by such technology, allowing content delivery to move online and freeing up classroom time for active learning and skill development activities. Such advocates for so-called "flipped" classrooms argue that students are better educated in the longterm as their ability to grasp key concepts and develop fundamental analytical skills is much improved from actually "doing" their subject.

This roundtable will focus on how to maximine student learning and engagement in medieval studies courses that are online. It will address the benefits and challenges of online education across a range of levels and disciplines in medieval studies, and it will offer experience from a range of people who have experimented with different online technology and techniques. Last year, I organized a more general roundtable on types of online teaching. This session was very well-received, and many people asked for a follow-up roundtable that would focus on some of the practical and technological aspects of online teaching. This roundtable will address these issues and provide an important resource for those wishing to include more online pedagogy in their courses.

Kate McGrath

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May 14th, 1:30 PM

Moving More Online: Strategies and Challenges for Using Technology in the "Classroom" (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1730

This will be a roundtable discussion of the growing use, and concerns with the use, of technology in the classroom. It will provide a balanced perspective on the development of new forms of pedagogy for teaching online classes.

There is a growing discussion among academics and the public about the appropriateness of online education for higher education. Much of this is centered on the declining public support for state funding of higher education institutions and the rising concern of the cost to college students. Online courses appear to many to be a possible solution, allowing for the education of more students with fewer faculty, especially fewer full-time faculty. At the same time, there are those in higher education who laud the pedagogical advancements offered by such technology, allowing content delivery to move online and freeing up classroom time for active learning and skill development activities. Such advocates for so-called "flipped" classrooms argue that students are better educated in the longterm as their ability to grasp key concepts and develop fundamental analytical skills is much improved from actually "doing" their subject.

This roundtable will focus on how to maximine student learning and engagement in medieval studies courses that are online. It will address the benefits and challenges of online education across a range of levels and disciplines in medieval studies, and it will offer experience from a range of people who have experimented with different online technology and techniques. Last year, I organized a more general roundtable on types of online teaching. This session was very well-received, and many people asked for a follow-up roundtable that would focus on some of the practical and technological aspects of online teaching. This roundtable will address these issues and provide an important resource for those wishing to include more online pedagogy in their courses.

Kate McGrath