Session Title

Text and Images in Medieval Manuscripts: Towards a Typology

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St. Louis Univ.

Organizer Name

Evelyn Meyer

Organizer Affiliation

St. Louis Univ.

Presider Name

Christian Schneider

Presider Affiliation

Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Paper Title 1

Maria Ormani (degli Albizzi) and the Problem of Self-Portraiture in Italian Manuscripts

Presenter 1 Name

Kathleen G. Arthur

Presenter 1 Affiliation

James Madison Univ.

Paper Title 2

Text, Image, and Devotion: Forms and Functions of Audience Engagement in Medieval Manuscripts

Presenter 2 Name

Eva von Contzen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Albert-Ludwigs-Univ. Freiburg

Start Date

12-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

This session seeks to explore the complex relationships between text and images in medieval manuscripts. Previous research has shown that illuminations in manuscripts, in part, follow their own rules and principles, rather than strictly ‘visualizing’ the textual content of the artifact. We still lack, however, a precise account of the possible relationships into which texts and images entered. Images serve to structure and frame a text, adding additional layers of meaning to it, sometimes even contradicting it. Moreover, we need to consider those instances in which the illuminations themselves contain text, such as inscriptions, labels (tituli), or banderoles. Therefore, this session asks which new insights are gained by shifting our focus towards a typology of images and their relationship to the text and welcomes contributions that work toward a typology of possible relationships between text and image(s) in medieval manuscripts.

Teresa E. Harvey

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Text and Images in Medieval Manuscripts: Towards a Typology

Schneider 1275

This session seeks to explore the complex relationships between text and images in medieval manuscripts. Previous research has shown that illuminations in manuscripts, in part, follow their own rules and principles, rather than strictly ‘visualizing’ the textual content of the artifact. We still lack, however, a precise account of the possible relationships into which texts and images entered. Images serve to structure and frame a text, adding additional layers of meaning to it, sometimes even contradicting it. Moreover, we need to consider those instances in which the illuminations themselves contain text, such as inscriptions, labels (tituli), or banderoles. Therefore, this session asks which new insights are gained by shifting our focus towards a typology of images and their relationship to the text and welcomes contributions that work toward a typology of possible relationships between text and image(s) in medieval manuscripts.

Teresa E. Harvey