Session Title

Crusading and the Byzantine Legacy in the Northwestern Black Sea Region

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Florida; Research Group on Manuscript Evidence

Organizer Name

Mildred Budny

Organizer Affiliation

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence

Presider Name

Florin Curta

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Paper Title 1

Between Byzantium, the Mongol Empire, Genoa, and Moldavia: Trade Centers in the Northwestern Black Sea Area

Presenter 1 Name

Laurenţiu Rădvan

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. Alexandru Ioan Cuza

Paper Title 2

The Crusade in the Black Sea Region: Discourses, Projects, and Actions from the Thirteenth to the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Ovidiu Cristea

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Institutul de Istorie "Nicolae Iorga"

Paper Title 3

A Plan for the Annihilation of Mehmed II in Moldavia (1475‒1476)

Presenter 3 Name

Liviu Pilat

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. Alexandru Ioan Cuza

Paper Title 4

Warriors' Corpses in the Moldavian Anti-Ottoman War of the Fifteenth-Sixteenth Centuries

Presenter 4 Name

Bodgan-Petru Maleon

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. Alexandru Ioan Cuza

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

During the first Three Crusades, the Black Sea remained outside the main routes along which the crusading armies moved towards the Holy Land, even though many of them crossed the Balkans and Asia Minor. The situation changed dramatically in the early 13th century, after the conquest of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade. With the rise in 1204 of the Latin Empire and the disintegration of Byzantine hegemony in the Black Sea region, “Western” hopes of recovering Jerusalem were placed on hold and a new phase opened in the history of the Crusades. From the establishment of the Latin Empire in the early 13th century to the Ottoman conquest in the 15th, the region of the Black Sea lay at the center of a major clash of powers, with a history most complicated. Byzantines, Mongols, Seljuq Turks from the emirates of Menteshe and Aydin, and then Ottoman Turks — all were influenced by later Crusade projects and strategies. In contrast with the passagium generale so typical for the first Crusades, later crusading in the Black Sea region was a passagium particularewith more limited goals, involving powers in the area.

The session will draw attention to this sphere of crusading, neglected until now. The purpose is to present several case studies of Crusade perception and comprehension, as viewed from small political actors such as the 14th– and 15th-century principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia. This quest makes it possible to show how both states, although Orthodox Christian and thus, if not outright hostile, at least cautious about the goals of the crusading movement, developed specific policies aimed at resisting Ottoman encroachment.

Details and developments appear on the website of the Research Group on Manuscript Evidence: http://manuscriptevidence.org/wpme/2016-international-congress-on-medieval-studies/

Mildred Budny

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Crusading and the Byzantine Legacy in the Northwestern Black Sea Region

Fetzer 1060

During the first Three Crusades, the Black Sea remained outside the main routes along which the crusading armies moved towards the Holy Land, even though many of them crossed the Balkans and Asia Minor. The situation changed dramatically in the early 13th century, after the conquest of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade. With the rise in 1204 of the Latin Empire and the disintegration of Byzantine hegemony in the Black Sea region, “Western” hopes of recovering Jerusalem were placed on hold and a new phase opened in the history of the Crusades. From the establishment of the Latin Empire in the early 13th century to the Ottoman conquest in the 15th, the region of the Black Sea lay at the center of a major clash of powers, with a history most complicated. Byzantines, Mongols, Seljuq Turks from the emirates of Menteshe and Aydin, and then Ottoman Turks — all were influenced by later Crusade projects and strategies. In contrast with the passagium generale so typical for the first Crusades, later crusading in the Black Sea region was a passagium particularewith more limited goals, involving powers in the area.

The session will draw attention to this sphere of crusading, neglected until now. The purpose is to present several case studies of Crusade perception and comprehension, as viewed from small political actors such as the 14th– and 15th-century principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia. This quest makes it possible to show how both states, although Orthodox Christian and thus, if not outright hostile, at least cautious about the goals of the crusading movement, developed specific policies aimed at resisting Ottoman encroachment.

Details and developments appear on the website of the Research Group on Manuscript Evidence: http://manuscriptevidence.org/wpme/2016-international-congress-on-medieval-studies/

Mildred Budny