Session Title

Beauty and the Beast: The Influence of the Medieval Bestiary in Text and Image

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Elizabeth Morrison

Organizer Affiliation

J. Paul Getty Museum

Presider Name

Elizabeth Morrison

Paper Title 1

Factual and Fictional Lions in Old Norse Romance

Presenter 1 Name

Florian Schreck

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. i Bergen

Paper Title 2

Inhabited Architecture: Animals and Animality at Wells Cathedral

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew M. Reeve

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Queen's Univ. Kingston

Paper Title 3

Looking Back at No-One: Altered Bestiary Imagery on the Hereford Map

Presenter 3 Name

Catherine Megan Crossley

Presenter 3 Affiliation

British Library

Start Date

12-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 158

Description

The role of animals in the Middle Ages has recently become a popular topic for research in all realms of medieval studies. Given this interest, it seems a good time to turn attention to perhaps the most important source of information about animals in the period, the bestiary. The animal stories contained in the bestiary were used as inspiration for public sermons, daily reading for the religious, and entertainment by the nobility, thereby exerting a powerful hold over the understanding and interpretation of animals in the medieval world. This session examines the influential role of the text and imagery of the bestiary. The iconic stories and stable iconography of the bestiary were so well-known, in fact, that the bestiary's legacy was instantly recognizable, even when the animals were separated from their manuscript origins. Papers for this session address the textual influence of the bestiary in other literary traditions and artistic media that integrate iconography traditionally associated with bestiaries.

Elizabeth Morrison

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 3:30 PM

Beauty and the Beast: The Influence of the Medieval Bestiary in Text and Image

Bernhard 158

The role of animals in the Middle Ages has recently become a popular topic for research in all realms of medieval studies. Given this interest, it seems a good time to turn attention to perhaps the most important source of information about animals in the period, the bestiary. The animal stories contained in the bestiary were used as inspiration for public sermons, daily reading for the religious, and entertainment by the nobility, thereby exerting a powerful hold over the understanding and interpretation of animals in the medieval world. This session examines the influential role of the text and imagery of the bestiary. The iconic stories and stable iconography of the bestiary were so well-known, in fact, that the bestiary's legacy was instantly recognizable, even when the animals were separated from their manuscript origins. Papers for this session address the textual influence of the bestiary in other literary traditions and artistic media that integrate iconography traditionally associated with bestiaries.

Elizabeth Morrison