Session Title

Medieval Peasant World II: Economy and Society

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS)

Organizer Name

Philip Slavin

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Kent

Presider Name

Miriam Müller

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Paper Title 1

Individuals, Communities, and Agricultural Change in Northern England: Culture and Practice in the Late Middle Ages

Presenter 1 Name

Peter L. Larson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Central Florida

Paper Title 2

Changing Environment: Peasants, Life, and Land at Late Medieval Herstmonceux, Sussex

Presenter 2 Name

Steven Bednarski

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 3

Rural Self-Administration and Venetian Governance on the Dalmatian Island of Korčula in the Fifteenth Century

Presenter 3 Name

Fabian Kümmeler

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. Wien

Start Date

12-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

This session deals with the topics of peasant economy and society. Despite their disproportionately large share within population, peasant society still remains relatively understudied field. This stands in a sharp contrast with the seigniorial sector, where a substantial number of important scholarly contributions have been offered in a last few decades. This is hardly surprising, given the dominant nature of the seigniorial sector within medieval socio-economic and administrative records. Reconstructing social and economic experiences of medieval peasants presents a far greater challenge. Despite countless barriers, however, recent years saw a fair number of studies dealing with late-medieval peasant economy and society. The proposed session aims to keep up with this line of research.

Philip Slavin

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May 12th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Peasant World II: Economy and Society

Bernhard 209

This session deals with the topics of peasant economy and society. Despite their disproportionately large share within population, peasant society still remains relatively understudied field. This stands in a sharp contrast with the seigniorial sector, where a substantial number of important scholarly contributions have been offered in a last few decades. This is hardly surprising, given the dominant nature of the seigniorial sector within medieval socio-economic and administrative records. Reconstructing social and economic experiences of medieval peasants presents a far greater challenge. Despite countless barriers, however, recent years saw a fair number of studies dealing with late-medieval peasant economy and society. The proposed session aims to keep up with this line of research.

Philip Slavin