Session Title

Unexpected Learning: The Variety of Educational Practices in Medieval Monastic Communities (Eighth- to Twelfth-Century)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Henri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies; Research Unit "Religion and Society in the Early and Central Middle Ages" (RESOMA), Univ. Gent

Organizer Name

Micol Long

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. Gent

Presider Name

Sigbjørn Olsen Sønnesyn

Presider Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Will There Be Any Required Reading? The Production and Use of Textbooks in the Carolingian Monastery

Presenter 1 Name

Matthew D. Ponesse

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ohio Dominican Univ.

Paper Title 2

Finding Space for Learning during the Abbacy of Peter the Venerable

Presenter 2 Name

Marc Saurette

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Carleton Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Emotions of Learning as Attested by Monastic Letters (Eleventh-Twelfth Century)

Presenter 3 Name

Micol Long

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Three different approaches to learning and its perceptions offer insights into the way in which monastic learning was integrated into the daily life of the monastery. Firstly, a close examination of the manuscripts of some Carolingian “monastic textbooks” reveals that they were used by monks at various times during the day, rather than solely by masters during formal teaching in the monastic school. Secondly, a survey of the variety of spaces in which twelfth-century Cluniac learning took place shows that, next to the traditional spaces of learning such as the chapter and the church, there were others, less expected places, such as the garret, the subterranean prison and even the cemetery. Finally, an analysis of the emotions often associated with learning in 11th and 12th century monastic letters sheds some light into the social nature of learning, which took place through different kinds of interactions between members of the monastic communities and was inextricably linked to the construction of personal and communal identities.

Micol Long

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Unexpected Learning: The Variety of Educational Practices in Medieval Monastic Communities (Eighth- to Twelfth-Century)

Fetzer 2030

Three different approaches to learning and its perceptions offer insights into the way in which monastic learning was integrated into the daily life of the monastery. Firstly, a close examination of the manuscripts of some Carolingian “monastic textbooks” reveals that they were used by monks at various times during the day, rather than solely by masters during formal teaching in the monastic school. Secondly, a survey of the variety of spaces in which twelfth-century Cluniac learning took place shows that, next to the traditional spaces of learning such as the chapter and the church, there were others, less expected places, such as the garret, the subterranean prison and even the cemetery. Finally, an analysis of the emotions often associated with learning in 11th and 12th century monastic letters sheds some light into the social nature of learning, which took place through different kinds of interactions between members of the monastic communities and was inextricably linked to the construction of personal and communal identities.

Micol Long