Session Title

Writing Song in the European Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies, King's College London

Organizer Name

David Murray

Organizer Affiliation

King's College London/Univ. de Paris-X

Presider Name

Emma Dillon

Presider Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 1

A Comparison of Song Notation in Insular and Continental Sources between the Twelfth and Fourteenth Century

Presenter 1 Name

Samantha Blickhan

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Royal Holloway, Univ. of London

Paper Title 2

Dividing Petrarch: Divisio and the Art of Memory in Jacopo da Bologna's Setting of "Non al suo amante" (RVF #52)

Presenter 2 Name

Lauren McGuire Jennings

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Paper Title 3

Chanson sans Frontières: Contrafacta of a Crusade Song

Presenter 3 Name

David Murray

Paper Title 4

Reshaping Song: Notational Practices in Liturgical and Vernacular Books in Thirteenth-Century Artois

Presenter 4 Name

Brianne Dolce

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 7:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

Scholarship increasingly recognizes that justice cannot be done to this essential and polysemous part of medieval culture within individual disciplines, be that according to the traditional music/poetry divide or the verbal language of a song. Scholars from musicology, palaeography, and literary studies consider how this current approach can be further developed. They ask in particular how to elaborate a more holistic study of medieval song and wider musico-literary culture, including the physical traces left by song. The panel, looking at material from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries from England and the Continent including France, Occitania, Germany, and Italy, will seek to show some of the benefits of and future avenues for a European study of song.

David Murray

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 7:30 PM

Writing Song in the European Middle Ages

Schneider 1335

Scholarship increasingly recognizes that justice cannot be done to this essential and polysemous part of medieval culture within individual disciplines, be that according to the traditional music/poetry divide or the verbal language of a song. Scholars from musicology, palaeography, and literary studies consider how this current approach can be further developed. They ask in particular how to elaborate a more holistic study of medieval song and wider musico-literary culture, including the physical traces left by song. The panel, looking at material from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries from England and the Continent including France, Occitania, Germany, and Italy, will seek to show some of the benefits of and future avenues for a European study of song.

David Murray