Session Title

The Interlingual Poetics of Chaucer's Book of the Duchess: English, French, or Franglais?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Jamie C. Fumo

Organizer Affiliation

Florida State Univ.

Presider Name

Jamie C. Fumo

Paper Title 1

"Counterfeit" Antiquity: Chaucer's Book of the Duchess and Its French Contexts

Presenter 1 Name

Elizaveta Strakhov

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Marquette Univ.

Paper Title 2

"Je ne sui pas Orpheüs": Repetition and the Trap of Lyric in Chaucer's Book of the Duchess and Froissart's Paradys d'amour

Presenter 2 Name

Benjamin S. W. Barootes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

McGill Univ.

Paper Title 3

Respondent

Presenter 3 Name

Jamie C. Fumo

Start Date

12-5-2016 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

The problem of interlingualism—being between languages—has preoccupied scholarship on Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess for more than a century and has gained new relevance in light of advances in our understanding of late-medieval insular vernacularity. As the first poem written in English to imbibe and rechannel the French dit amoureux tradition, and as a narrative that richly evokes shifts among linguistic registers and cultural perspectives, the Book of the Duchess has long been considered Chaucer’s most “French” poem, even as it inaugurates a signature Chaucerian tradition of “English literature.” This session explores how the Book of the Duchess models and intervenes in the cultural dialogue between Englishness and Frenchness, how it imagines a collaborative model of authorship across vernaculars, and to what degree it can be understood as both “multilingual” and seminally “English.”

Jamie Fumo

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May 12th, 7:30 PM

The Interlingual Poetics of Chaucer's Book of the Duchess: English, French, or Franglais?

Bernhard 106

The problem of interlingualism—being between languages—has preoccupied scholarship on Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess for more than a century and has gained new relevance in light of advances in our understanding of late-medieval insular vernacularity. As the first poem written in English to imbibe and rechannel the French dit amoureux tradition, and as a narrative that richly evokes shifts among linguistic registers and cultural perspectives, the Book of the Duchess has long been considered Chaucer’s most “French” poem, even as it inaugurates a signature Chaucerian tradition of “English literature.” This session explores how the Book of the Duchess models and intervenes in the cultural dialogue between Englishness and Frenchness, how it imagines a collaborative model of authorship across vernaculars, and to what degree it can be understood as both “multilingual” and seminally “English.”

Jamie Fumo