Session Title

Models and Copies, Masters and Pupils: New Work on Spanish Illuminated Manuscripts in Memory of John Williams

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)

Organizer Name

David Raizman

Organizer Affiliation

Drexel Univ.

Presider Name

Therese Martin

Presider Affiliation

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Paper Title 1

Copies, Originals, and the Impoverishment of Images

Presenter 1 Name

Robert A. Maxwell

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Institute of Fine Arts, New York Univ.

Paper Title 2

Further Perspectives on "A Castilian Tradition of Bible Illustration": Re-examining the Connection between the Bibles of San Isidoro de Leon (960 and 1162)

Presenter 2 Name

Ana Hernandez

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Complutense de Madrid

Paper Title 3

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Seder: What the "Hispano-Moresque" Haggadah Can Tell Us about Medieval Creativity

Presenter 3 Name

Julie A. Harris

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Spertus Institute

Start Date

13-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

This session centers on copies that depart from their models and pupils who do not always tread directly in the footsteps of their masters. Our point of departure is the inimitable work of John Williams (1928-2015) in the field of illuminated manuscripts, particularly the Beatus Commentaries on the Apocalypse, which has inspired scholars beyond the bounds of Spanish medievalism. Williams broke away from his early training, which held that an unprecedented image must have been based on a lost model. He came rather to recognize originality in medieval works of art and to highlight the previously unperceived agency of illuminators from the early Middle Ages. Our presenters question traditionally-held assumptions of art historical scholarship, particularly concerning illuminations that do not consistently copy their models. We are interested in the choice to deviate from an archetype, especially the ways in which such decisions give rise to provocative new questions about intentionality and audience, likeness and divergence, and scholarly innovations that lead to paradigm shifts.

This session will provide a counterpart to the 90-minute documentary on the Beatus manuscripts, which will be screened at WMU ("Beatus: The Apnish Apocalypse). Featuring extensive commentary and reflections on the Beatus tradition together with related aspects of the art of medieval Spain, John Williams guides the viewers through the development of his thinking on this monastic phenomenon, bringing it up to date with recent discoveries. This ICMA-sponsored session in celebration of John Williams will carry his legacy into the future by stimulating new scholarly debate and continuing his practice of challenging the discipline.

David Raizman

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

Models and Copies, Masters and Pupils: New Work on Spanish Illuminated Manuscripts in Memory of John Williams

Fetzer 1010

This session centers on copies that depart from their models and pupils who do not always tread directly in the footsteps of their masters. Our point of departure is the inimitable work of John Williams (1928-2015) in the field of illuminated manuscripts, particularly the Beatus Commentaries on the Apocalypse, which has inspired scholars beyond the bounds of Spanish medievalism. Williams broke away from his early training, which held that an unprecedented image must have been based on a lost model. He came rather to recognize originality in medieval works of art and to highlight the previously unperceived agency of illuminators from the early Middle Ages. Our presenters question traditionally-held assumptions of art historical scholarship, particularly concerning illuminations that do not consistently copy their models. We are interested in the choice to deviate from an archetype, especially the ways in which such decisions give rise to provocative new questions about intentionality and audience, likeness and divergence, and scholarly innovations that lead to paradigm shifts.

This session will provide a counterpart to the 90-minute documentary on the Beatus manuscripts, which will be screened at WMU ("Beatus: The Apnish Apocalypse). Featuring extensive commentary and reflections on the Beatus tradition together with related aspects of the art of medieval Spain, John Williams guides the viewers through the development of his thinking on this monastic phenomenon, bringing it up to date with recent discoveries. This ICMA-sponsored session in celebration of John Williams will carry his legacy into the future by stimulating new scholarly debate and continuing his practice of challenging the discipline.

David Raizman