Session Title

Editing for the Classroom, Translating for the Stage: Making Medieval Drama Accessible to Modern Audiences

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS)

Organizer Name

Frank M. Napolitano

Organizer Affiliation

Radford Univ.

Presider Name

Andrew M. Pfrenger

Presider Affiliation

Kent State Univ.-Salem

Paper Title 1

Is There an Audience for This Play? Constructing the Reader of Modernized Medieval Drama

Presenter 1 Name

Christina M. Fitzgerald, John T. Sebastian

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Toledo, Loyola Univ. New Orleans

Paper Title 2

Ethically Glossing/Glossing Ethically: Working with Public-Domain Texts

Presenter 2 Name

Cameron Hunt McNabb, Frank M. Napolitano

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Southeastern Univ., Radford Univ.

Paper Title 3

Translation and Fashion, or, How Long Is a Translation Supposed to Last?

Presenter 3 Name

Mario B. Longtin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Western Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

Scholars have continued their efforts to make medieval drama accessible to modern audiences, producing several "classroom" texts and adapting or translating plays for performance. These efforts prompt several questions: How does the method of publication (print or electronic) affect the presentation of text and apparatus? How does the interpretive apparatus of stand-alone editions differ from those of thematic or period-based anthologies? How do performance goals affect the degree to which a production modifies the text? How do fixed or changing spaces, players, and audiences affect a play’s production? The panel welcomes papers exploring these and other questions related to adapting medieval drama for modern audiences.

Frank M. Napolitano

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

Editing for the Classroom, Translating for the Stage: Making Medieval Drama Accessible to Modern Audiences

Schneider 1120

Scholars have continued their efforts to make medieval drama accessible to modern audiences, producing several "classroom" texts and adapting or translating plays for performance. These efforts prompt several questions: How does the method of publication (print or electronic) affect the presentation of text and apparatus? How does the interpretive apparatus of stand-alone editions differ from those of thematic or period-based anthologies? How do performance goals affect the degree to which a production modifies the text? How do fixed or changing spaces, players, and audiences affect a play’s production? The panel welcomes papers exploring these and other questions related to adapting medieval drama for modern audiences.

Frank M. Napolitano