Session Title

Twenty Years of the Malory Companion (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Cory James Rushton

Organizer Affiliation

St. Francis Xavier Univ.

Presider Name

Kevin S. Whetter

Presider Affiliation

Acadia Univ.

Paper Title 1

Malory and His Contemporaries

Presenter 1 Name

Megan Leitch

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Cardiff Univ.

Paper Title 2

Malory's Identity

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas H. Crofts, III

Presenter 2 Affiliation

East Tennessee State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Malory and Form

Presenter 3 Name

Cory James Rushton

Paper Title 4

Malory's Women: Radical Subjects

Presenter 4 Name

Amy S. Kaufman

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Middle Tennessee State Univ.

Paper Title 5

Respondent

Presenter 5 Name

Dorsey Armstrong

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

The 2015 meeting of the International Congress on Medieval studies included five sessions on Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur, including the now traditional "Reading Malory" session, and at least three times as many sessions included papers on Malory. Malory's transformation has been rapid: once considered formally clumsy and resistant to theoretical approaches, Malory's text now seems to sustain a variety of approaches even as his artistry is revisited and reconsidered. One clear reason for this shift in critical fortunes was the publication of D. S. Brewer's A Companion to Malory in 1996, edited by Elizabeth Archibald and A. S. G. Edwards. This round table will examine the impact and influence of this volume on Malory Studies, with particular emphasis on the interplay between the volume and both traditional and emerging discussions of the Morte Darthur and its context.

Cory J. Rushton

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 10:00 AM

Twenty Years of the Malory Companion (A Roundtable)

Valley III Stinson Lounge

The 2015 meeting of the International Congress on Medieval studies included five sessions on Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur, including the now traditional "Reading Malory" session, and at least three times as many sessions included papers on Malory. Malory's transformation has been rapid: once considered formally clumsy and resistant to theoretical approaches, Malory's text now seems to sustain a variety of approaches even as his artistry is revisited and reconsidered. One clear reason for this shift in critical fortunes was the publication of D. S. Brewer's A Companion to Malory in 1996, edited by Elizabeth Archibald and A. S. G. Edwards. This round table will examine the impact and influence of this volume on Malory Studies, with particular emphasis on the interplay between the volume and both traditional and emerging discussions of the Morte Darthur and its context.

Cory J. Rushton