Session Title

Anglo-Saxon Books and Libraries: In Memoriam Lewis Nicholson (A Panel Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Institute, Univ. of Notre Dame

Organizer Name

Mae Kilker

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Presider Name

Christopher Robert John Scheirer

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 1

Building an Archive: The Peterborough Chronicle in Local Context

Presenter 1 Name

Scott Thompson Smith

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Homilies, Apocrypha, and Preaching Networks in Anglo-Saxon England

Presenter 2 Name

Brandon W. Hawk

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Rhode Island College

Paper Title 3

An Anglo-Saxon Library in Early Modern England: Formation and Use

Presenter 3 Name

Timothy C. Graham

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Start Date

13-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 205

Description

This past April sadly saw the passing of Lewis E. Nicholson, an Anglo-Saxonist and Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, as well as an integral and vital part of the intellectual life of the medievalist community for over six decades. To honor Professor Nicholson's life and legacy, our panelists' papers focus on libraries and intellectual communities in medieval England and beyond. Scott T. Smith elucidates the creation of the Peterborough Chronicle, specifically how the community's selective use of charters, diplomas, and chronicles sculpted a vernacular archive of self-confirming authenticity. Brandon W. Hawk reconsiders homiliaries and apocrypha as media artifacts of geographic and textual networks, with special consideration to their circulation and usage at centers of book production. Finally, Timothy C. Graham discusses Archbishop Matthew Parker's formation of the first major Anglo-Saxon library, and its usage by such luminaries as William L'Isle, Abraham Wheelock, William and Elizabeth Elstob, and David Wilkins once it was part of the Corpus Christi College, Cambridge materials. The intersection of this research on the formation, distribution, and research on Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and libraries encapsulates Professor Nicholson's research and the rich breadth of Anglo-Saxon intellectual culture.

Mae Kilker

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

Anglo-Saxon Books and Libraries: In Memoriam Lewis Nicholson (A Panel Discussion)

Bernhard 205

This past April sadly saw the passing of Lewis E. Nicholson, an Anglo-Saxonist and Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, as well as an integral and vital part of the intellectual life of the medievalist community for over six decades. To honor Professor Nicholson's life and legacy, our panelists' papers focus on libraries and intellectual communities in medieval England and beyond. Scott T. Smith elucidates the creation of the Peterborough Chronicle, specifically how the community's selective use of charters, diplomas, and chronicles sculpted a vernacular archive of self-confirming authenticity. Brandon W. Hawk reconsiders homiliaries and apocrypha as media artifacts of geographic and textual networks, with special consideration to their circulation and usage at centers of book production. Finally, Timothy C. Graham discusses Archbishop Matthew Parker's formation of the first major Anglo-Saxon library, and its usage by such luminaries as William L'Isle, Abraham Wheelock, William and Elizabeth Elstob, and David Wilkins once it was part of the Corpus Christi College, Cambridge materials. The intersection of this research on the formation, distribution, and research on Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and libraries encapsulates Professor Nicholson's research and the rich breadth of Anglo-Saxon intellectual culture.

Mae Kilker