Session Title

Hylomorphism and Mereology

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics

Organizer Name

Alexander W. Hall

Organizer Affiliation

Clayton State Univ.

Presider Name

Alexander W. Hall

Paper Title 1

Boethius of Dacia on the _Differentiae_ and the Unity of Definitions

Presenter 1 Name

Rodrigo Guerizoli

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Paper Title 2

What Has Aquinas Got against Platonic Forms?

Presenter 2 Name

Turner C. Nevitt

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of San Diego

Paper Title 3

Mereological Hylomorphism and the Development of the Buridanian Account of Formal Consequence

Presenter 3 Name

Jacob Archambault

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 212

Description

Mereology is the metaphysical theory of parts and wholes, including their conditions of identity and persistence through change. Hylomorphism is the Aristotelian metaphysical doctrine according to which all natural substances, including living organisms, consist of matter and form as their essential parts, where the substantial form of living organisms is identified as their soul. Consequently, medieval philosophers’ discussions of these topics cover a broad philosophical terrain, taking in the problem of material constitution, biological organization and the principle of life, human nature, and even the fate of the soul after death. Specifically, medieval thought on these issues is of broader interest to contemporary philosophers, given that medieval theories are now offered as viable alternatives to various modern understandings of the related problems.

Alexander W. Hall

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May 13th, 10:00 AM

Hylomorphism and Mereology

Bernhard 212

Mereology is the metaphysical theory of parts and wholes, including their conditions of identity and persistence through change. Hylomorphism is the Aristotelian metaphysical doctrine according to which all natural substances, including living organisms, consist of matter and form as their essential parts, where the substantial form of living organisms is identified as their soul. Consequently, medieval philosophers’ discussions of these topics cover a broad philosophical terrain, taking in the problem of material constitution, biological organization and the principle of life, human nature, and even the fate of the soul after death. Specifically, medieval thought on these issues is of broader interest to contemporary philosophers, given that medieval theories are now offered as viable alternatives to various modern understandings of the related problems.

Alexander W. Hall