Session Title

Surrounding Medieval Women: Female Occupation of Secular Architecture and Landscape

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Art History, Northwestern Univ.

Organizer Name

Scott David Miller, Sarah W. Townsend

Organizer Affiliation

Northwestern Univ., Univ. of Pennsylvania

Presider Name

Sarah W. Townsend

Paper Title 1

The Geography of Possession: Reframing Women's Spatial Practices in Thirteenth-Century Insular Romances

Presenter 1 Name

Gabriela Cavalheiro

Presenter 1 Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 2

Staging the Home in Chaucer's Reeve's Tale

Presenter 2 Name

Sarah Stanbury

Presenter 2 Affiliation

College of the Holy Cross

Paper Title 3

Female Desire and the Bedchamber in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Presenter 3 Name

Charlotte Knight

Presenter 3 Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 4

The Spatial Practice of Pregnancy in Early Valois France

Presenter 4 Name

Scott David Miller

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

This session investigates the architectural enmeshment of literary practice and focuses in particular on the spatial practice of medieval secular women, examining how women inhabit domestic, courtly and public spaces. By including both art historical and literary papers, the panel proposes to theorize an interdisciplinary approach to gender and space. How might we think of both literature and architectural space as framing devices that shaped medieval social practice?

Sarah W. Townsend, Scott D. Miller

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Surrounding Medieval Women: Female Occupation of Secular Architecture and Landscape

Schneider 1245

This session investigates the architectural enmeshment of literary practice and focuses in particular on the spatial practice of medieval secular women, examining how women inhabit domestic, courtly and public spaces. By including both art historical and literary papers, the panel proposes to theorize an interdisciplinary approach to gender and space. How might we think of both literature and architectural space as framing devices that shaped medieval social practice?

Sarah W. Townsend, Scott D. Miller