Session Title

Lollardy and Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Lollard Society

Organizer Name

Mary Raschko, Robyn Malo

Organizer Affiliation

Whitman College, Purdue Univ.

Presider Name

Robyn Malo

Paper Title 1

Exaggerating the Effects of Arundel's Constitutions on Literary Production

Presenter 1 Name

Henry Ansgar Kelly

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 2

The Nature of the Question in the Vernacular: Lollardy and the Laity

Presenter 2 Name

Erika D. Harman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 3

Literary Lollards: Forms of Faith, Arts of Polemic

Presenter 3 Name

Mary Raschko

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Emily Steiner

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Start Date

13-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

As a part of the so-called “religious turn,” the study of lollardy (or Wycliffism) in Middle English literature has flourished over the past two decades. This panel aims to take stock of what such scholarship has achieved and to identify directions for future research. Do we read Chaucer, Langland, Hoccleve, or Lydgate differently in light of lollard studies? If we don’t, should we? What place do lollard texts hold in the corpus of Middle English literature or within English literature curricula? How do we better understand anticlerical, antifraternal, or other dissenting discourses within English literary history? Alternatively, how might emphasis on lollardy distort the literary landscape, such that we become too prone to “smelle a loller in the wind”? The panel will address assumptions, methods, and research questions that shape our understanding of dissent, reform, or heterodox belief in Middle English literature.

Mary Raschko

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May 13th, 1:30 PM

Lollardy and Literature

Fetzer 1060

As a part of the so-called “religious turn,” the study of lollardy (or Wycliffism) in Middle English literature has flourished over the past two decades. This panel aims to take stock of what such scholarship has achieved and to identify directions for future research. Do we read Chaucer, Langland, Hoccleve, or Lydgate differently in light of lollard studies? If we don’t, should we? What place do lollard texts hold in the corpus of Middle English literature or within English literature curricula? How do we better understand anticlerical, antifraternal, or other dissenting discourses within English literary history? Alternatively, how might emphasis on lollardy distort the literary landscape, such that we become too prone to “smelle a loller in the wind”? The panel will address assumptions, methods, and research questions that shape our understanding of dissent, reform, or heterodox belief in Middle English literature.

Mary Raschko