Session Title

Comparing Bilingualism in the Anglo-Saxon and Frankish Worlds I: Literacy and Languages in Charters

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Languages of Early Medieval Charters, Univ. del País Vasco

Organizer Name

Francesca Tinti

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

Presider Name

Andrew Rabin

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Louisville

Paper Title 1

Latin and Vernacular in Early Medieval Charters: From Anglo-Saxon England to Eastern Francia

Presenter 1 Name

Francesca Tinti

Paper Title 2

Language Choice in Anglo-Saxon Charters: Production, Use, and Audience

Presenter 2 Name

Robert Gallagher

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

Paper Title 3

Old High German in East Frankish Charters: Pragmatic Literacy or Bilingualism?

Presenter 3 Name

Edward Roberts

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Liverpool/Univ. del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

Start Date

13-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1265

Description

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this first session all examine the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in early medieval charters and its implications for the study of bilingualism and documentary culture.

Edward Roberts , Francesca Tinti

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 13th, 1:30 PM

Comparing Bilingualism in the Anglo-Saxon and Frankish Worlds I: Literacy and Languages in Charters

Schneider 1265

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this first session all examine the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in early medieval charters and its implications for the study of bilingualism and documentary culture.

Edward Roberts , Francesca Tinti