Session Title

Law and Ideal Justice in Medieval Contexts and Beyond

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Toy-Fung Tung

Organizer Affiliation

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Presider Name

Toy-Fung Tung

Paper Title 1

Statues, Statutes, and Justice in The Pilgrimage of the Soul

Presenter 1 Name

Rosemarie McGerr

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 2

Just Don't Moon the Judge: Women, Justice, and Advocacie in Jehan le Fèvre and Christine de Pizan

Presenter 2 Name

Linda Burke

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Elmhurst College

Paper Title 3

"Tenuto buono e male adoperando": From Trickery to Criminality in Decameron 3.6 and 4.2

Presenter 3 Name

Margaret Escher

Presenter 3 Affiliation

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Start Date

13-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

How do medieval law and ideal justice converge or clash in legal, literary, philosophical, theological, and historical texts, as well as in the visual arts, architecture, and performances? This question invites an interdisciplinary approach that examines how narrative and other non-legal perspectives can address thorny issues of justice, where law fails. Of particular interest is how competing texts, genres, discourses, expressions, and values contributed to the formation of medieval concepts of law and justice, such as legal identity, citizenship, sovereignty, polity, community, fairness, legitimacy, criminality, contracts, international relations, and individual and social welfare.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon

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May 13th, 1:30 PM

Law and Ideal Justice in Medieval Contexts and Beyond

Schneider 1275

How do medieval law and ideal justice converge or clash in legal, literary, philosophical, theological, and historical texts, as well as in the visual arts, architecture, and performances? This question invites an interdisciplinary approach that examines how narrative and other non-legal perspectives can address thorny issues of justice, where law fails. Of particular interest is how competing texts, genres, discourses, expressions, and values contributed to the formation of medieval concepts of law and justice, such as legal identity, citizenship, sovereignty, polity, community, fairness, legitimacy, criminality, contracts, international relations, and individual and social welfare.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon