Session Title

(Re)configuring the Parish in Late Medieval England

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), Univ. of Birmingham

Organizer Name

Robert N. Swanson

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Presider Name

Miriam Müller

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Paper Title 1

Managing Change: Reconfiguring Parochial Relationships at Alberbury (Shropshire), ca.1400-1530

Presenter 1 Name

Robert N. Swanson

Paper Title 2

Allhallows London Wall, 1455-1536: A History of Collaboration in Parish Decision Making

Presenter 2 Name

Gary G. Gibbs

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Roanoke College

Paper Title 3

Chapel on the Bridge: The Social and Communal Significance of the Late Medieval London-Bridge House

Presenter 3 Name

Emmamarie Haasl

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Start Date

13-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

Despite extensive recent work on the late medieval English parish, notably as a community of lay parishioners, this foundational component of the institutional church and central site of local liturgical and devotional life continues to provide extensive opportunities for further research and analysis. Offering a range of case studies which address different facets of the broad concept of ‘(re)configuration’, this session contributes to the ongoing analysis of the parish as both institution and social organism, as an ecclesiastical unit but also a focus for lay association and local sense of identity and belonging.

R.N. Swanson

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May 13th, 1:30 PM

(Re)configuring the Parish in Late Medieval England

Bernhard 210

Despite extensive recent work on the late medieval English parish, notably as a community of lay parishioners, this foundational component of the institutional church and central site of local liturgical and devotional life continues to provide extensive opportunities for further research and analysis. Offering a range of case studies which address different facets of the broad concept of ‘(re)configuration’, this session contributes to the ongoing analysis of the parish as both institution and social organism, as an ecclesiastical unit but also a focus for lay association and local sense of identity and belonging.

R.N. Swanson