Session Title

The Secular Clergy and Education

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

William H. Campbell

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Pittsburgh-Greensburg

Presider Name

Michael Burger

Presider Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Paper Title 1

The Education of the Parish Clergy in Thirteenth-Century England

Presenter 1 Name

William H. Campbell

Paper Title 2

Secular Clergy and Pastoral Care at the University of Paris

Presenter 2 Name

Stephen M. Metzger

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Paper Title 3

University Attendance among the Late Medieval Parish Clergy: A Case Study from the Diocese of Eichstätt

Presenter 3 Name

Matt Wranovix

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of New Haven

Start Date

13-5-2016 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

Outside of the fields of medicine and civil law, the medieval clergy dominated the ranks of formal educators and educated. This session seeks to explore the role of the secular clergy within educational and educated milieux: papers considering such facets as the secular clergy's involvement in the development of cathedral schools and universities; the educational level of parish clergy; whether and how far education led to career advancement; non-school venues of teaching, such as apprenticeship to the parish priest, or lectures and sermons by archdeacons and bishops; clergy pursuing worldly subjects of study and thought; and clergy as educators of the laity.

Michael Burger

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May 13th, 1:30 PM

The Secular Clergy and Education

Bernhard 211

Outside of the fields of medicine and civil law, the medieval clergy dominated the ranks of formal educators and educated. This session seeks to explore the role of the secular clergy within educational and educated milieux: papers considering such facets as the secular clergy's involvement in the development of cathedral schools and universities; the educational level of parish clergy; whether and how far education led to career advancement; non-school venues of teaching, such as apprenticeship to the parish priest, or lectures and sermons by archdeacons and bishops; clergy pursuing worldly subjects of study and thought; and clergy as educators of the laity.

Michael Burger