Session Title

The Culture of Port Cities in the Fourteenth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

William Chester Jordan

Organizer Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Presider Name

Marie D'Aguanno Ito

Presider Affiliation

Georgetown Univ.

Paper Title 1

Ports and Prostitutes: Rethinking the Margins

Presenter 1 Name

Susan McDonough

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland–Baltimore County

Paper Title 2

Wissant: The Forgotten Port

Presenter 2 Name

William Chester Jordan

Start Date

13-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson 303

Description

The Culture of Port Cities in the Fourteenth Century.
Organizer: William Chester Jordan, Princeton University, wchester@princeton.edu.

The phrase "port cities," as it applies to the Middle Ages, subsumes: (1) densely populated settlements on the marine littoral in which activities directly related to shipping dominate the economy and society (e.g. Dover); (2) similarly populated settlements in which shipping and shipbuilding are important but secondary to the actual production of goods within the settlements for subsequent trade oversea or inland (e.g., a number of Italian cities); and (3) also similarly populated settlements which serve equally or primarily as centers of territorial governance (e.g., ducal Rouen). This session explores the variety of fourteenth-century port cities and the distinctive cultural life they manifested.

Marie D. Ito

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

The Culture of Port Cities in the Fourteenth Century

Valley III Stinson 303

The Culture of Port Cities in the Fourteenth Century.
Organizer: William Chester Jordan, Princeton University, wchester@princeton.edu.

The phrase "port cities," as it applies to the Middle Ages, subsumes: (1) densely populated settlements on the marine littoral in which activities directly related to shipping dominate the economy and society (e.g. Dover); (2) similarly populated settlements in which shipping and shipbuilding are important but secondary to the actual production of goods within the settlements for subsequent trade oversea or inland (e.g., a number of Italian cities); and (3) also similarly populated settlements which serve equally or primarily as centers of territorial governance (e.g., ducal Rouen). This session explores the variety of fourteenth-century port cities and the distinctive cultural life they manifested.

Marie D. Ito