Session Title

The Abbey of Saint-Victor: Theology in Summae, Sequences, and Sermons

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Grover A. Zinn, Jr.

Organizer Affiliation

Oberlin College

Presider Name

Grover A. Zinn, Jr.

Paper Title 1

The Mutation of Hugh of Saint-Victor's On the Sacraments and the Nascence of Peter Lombard's Sentences

Presenter 1 Name

Robert J. Porwoll

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 2

Human Love an Echo of the Divine: Adam of Saint-Victor on Christian Love

Presenter 2 Name

Juliet Mousseau, RSCJ

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Aquinas Institute of Theology

Paper Title 3

A Most Useful Spirit: "Utilitas" as a Pneumatological Attribute in the Theology of Achard of Saint-Victor

Presenter 3 Name

Nicole Reibe

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston College

Start Date

13-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley I Ackley 106

Description

Three regular canons of the Abbey of Saint-Victor (St Victor or St. Victor), Paris, are subjects of papers in this session: Hugh, Adam and Achard. The pedagogy and theology of Hugh are assessed by Peter Porwoll in relation to the later Sentences of Peter Lombard, in the context of the development of theology in the Parisian schools. Juliet Mousseau explores the way in which several of Adam’s sequences present a theology of love, both human and divine, while expressing Trinitarian and Marian aspects of this. Nicole Reibe analyzes Achard’s presentation of the role of the Holy Spirit in the spiritual life of the individual, with particular attention to Achard’s use of utilitas to describe the Spirit and to relate the Spirit to the other members of the Trinity.

Grover A. Zinn, Jr.

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

The Abbey of Saint-Victor: Theology in Summae, Sequences, and Sermons

Valley I Ackley 106

Three regular canons of the Abbey of Saint-Victor (St Victor or St. Victor), Paris, are subjects of papers in this session: Hugh, Adam and Achard. The pedagogy and theology of Hugh are assessed by Peter Porwoll in relation to the later Sentences of Peter Lombard, in the context of the development of theology in the Parisian schools. Juliet Mousseau explores the way in which several of Adam’s sequences present a theology of love, both human and divine, while expressing Trinitarian and Marian aspects of this. Nicole Reibe analyzes Achard’s presentation of the role of the Holy Spirit in the spiritual life of the individual, with particular attention to Achard’s use of utilitas to describe the Spirit and to relate the Spirit to the other members of the Trinity.

Grover A. Zinn, Jr.