Session Title

Comparing Bilingualism in the Anglo-Saxon and Frankish Worlds II: The Languages of Anglo-Saxon Poetry and Historiography

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Languages of Early Medieval Charters, Univ. del País Vasco

Organizer Name

Francesca Tinti

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

Presider Name

Francesca Tinti

Paper Title 1

Ghosts of Latin in the Vernacular: Bilingualism and the Meter of The Riming Poem

Presenter 1 Name

Rachel Hanks

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 2

Anthologizing across Linguistic Divides: The Exeter Book and Cambridge GG 5.35

Presenter 2 Name

Audrey Walton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Translating the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles into Latin: Asser and Aethelweard

Presenter 3 Name

Courtnay Konshuh

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Winchester

Start Date

13-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1265

Description

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this second session all examine the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in Anglo-Saxon England, exploring metrical structure as a source for bilingualism, the production of Old English and Latin poetic compilations, and the significance of Latin translations of Old English historiography.

Edward Roberts , Francesca Tinti

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

Comparing Bilingualism in the Anglo-Saxon and Frankish Worlds II: The Languages of Anglo-Saxon Poetry and Historiography

Schneider 1265

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this second session all examine the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in Anglo-Saxon England, exploring metrical structure as a source for bilingualism, the production of Old English and Latin poetic compilations, and the significance of Latin translations of Old English historiography.

Edward Roberts , Francesca Tinti