Session Title

"Antitheta quae sententiae pulchritudinem faciunt" (Isidore): Contrasts in Medieval Texts and Images

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Medieval Studies, Central European Univ.

Organizer Name

Gerhard Jaritz

Organizer Affiliation

Central European Univ.

Presider Name

Gerhard Jaritz

Paper Title 1

"Imagines in Ecclesiis": Bonaventure's Defense of Sculpture in Thirteenth-Century France

Presenter 1 Name

Brandon L. Cook

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 2

"Sub Una, Sub Utraque": Contrasting Visions of Religious Communities in Post-Hussite Bohemia

Presenter 2 Name

Katerina Hornickova

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Wien

Paper Title 3

Negotiating Female Chastity: Self-Fashioning In Late Medieval German Cosmographies

Presenter 3 Name

Irina Savinetskaya

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 4

Contrasting Images from the Edges of the World: Eastern European Lands in the Fifteenth to the First Half of the Sixteenth Century

Presenter 4 Name

Alena Kliuchnik

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Central European Univ.

Start Date

13-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1330

Description

Contrasts and opposites played a particular role in many medieval textual and visual discourses, discussions, and arguments: in social, religious, economic, and political respect as well as concerning specific topics like, e.g., virtues and vices, the "laudatio temporis acti," world upside down, and so on. The created ‘beauty of thought’ is certainly not (only) to be seen from an aesthetic point of view but generally with regard to aspects of didactics, function, and practicality. The session intends to offer different analyses of such contrast reasoning and the discussion to which extent they followed similar or comparable patterns.

Gerhard Jaritz

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

"Antitheta quae sententiae pulchritudinem faciunt" (Isidore): Contrasts in Medieval Texts and Images

Schneider 1330

Contrasts and opposites played a particular role in many medieval textual and visual discourses, discussions, and arguments: in social, religious, economic, and political respect as well as concerning specific topics like, e.g., virtues and vices, the "laudatio temporis acti," world upside down, and so on. The created ‘beauty of thought’ is certainly not (only) to be seen from an aesthetic point of view but generally with regard to aspects of didactics, function, and practicality. The session intends to offer different analyses of such contrast reasoning and the discussion to which extent they followed similar or comparable patterns.

Gerhard Jaritz