Session Title

Premodern Rulers and Postmodern Viewers: Gender and Sex in Medieval Film and Television

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Royal Studies Journal

Organizer Name

Janice North

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fayetteville

Presider Name

Janice North

Paper Title 1

Melusine, Magic, and Maternal Blood in The White Queen

Presenter 1 Name

Misty Urban

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Muscatine Community College

Paper Title 2

"Men go to battle, women wage war": Gender Politics in The White Queen (2013)

Presenter 2 Name

Kavita Mudan Finn

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

A New Isabel for the Twenty-First Century

Presenter 3 Name

Emily S. Beck

Presenter 3 Affiliation

College of Charleston

Paper Title 4

Queering Isabella: The "She-Wolf of France" in Film and Television

Presenter 4 Name

Michael R. Evans

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Delta College

Start Date

13-5-2016 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

This panel is designed to encourage scholarship on the postmodern reception and representation of medieval and early modern rulers and other members of the royal household—both historical and fictional adaptations—in film and in television. Medieval-themed fantasy and historical dramas have been on the rise in recent years, which in turn has led to a proliferation of scholarly works focused on medieval film, such as The Medieval Motion Picture: The Politics of Adaptation (Johnston et al., 2014), Remaking the Middle Ages: The Methods of Cinema and History in Portraying the Medieval World (Elliot, 2011), and Queer Movie Medievalisms (Kelly and Puch, 2009), just to name a few of the recent edited collections. With the sustained popularity of these genres, there is a continuous need for feminist and queer readings of these texts. This panel will explore the interaction that occurs between premodern and postmodern sensibilities in the adaptation and viewing processes and interrogate the ways in which medieval film shapes and questions our understanding of gender and sexuality in the premodern royal court. Proposed papers may address how these portrayals reveal vestiges of premodern ideologies in contemporary society, or conversely, how the texts’ creators and audience project postmodern values onto these texts. We also welcome papers that address questions of temporality, adaptations and source materials, or representations of a particular ruler or member of the royal household in multiple texts.

Janice R. North

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May 13th, 3:30 PM

Premodern Rulers and Postmodern Viewers: Gender and Sex in Medieval Film and Television

Schneider 1335

This panel is designed to encourage scholarship on the postmodern reception and representation of medieval and early modern rulers and other members of the royal household—both historical and fictional adaptations—in film and in television. Medieval-themed fantasy and historical dramas have been on the rise in recent years, which in turn has led to a proliferation of scholarly works focused on medieval film, such as The Medieval Motion Picture: The Politics of Adaptation (Johnston et al., 2014), Remaking the Middle Ages: The Methods of Cinema and History in Portraying the Medieval World (Elliot, 2011), and Queer Movie Medievalisms (Kelly and Puch, 2009), just to name a few of the recent edited collections. With the sustained popularity of these genres, there is a continuous need for feminist and queer readings of these texts. This panel will explore the interaction that occurs between premodern and postmodern sensibilities in the adaptation and viewing processes and interrogate the ways in which medieval film shapes and questions our understanding of gender and sexuality in the premodern royal court. Proposed papers may address how these portrayals reveal vestiges of premodern ideologies in contemporary society, or conversely, how the texts’ creators and audience project postmodern values onto these texts. We also welcome papers that address questions of temporality, adaptations and source materials, or representations of a particular ruler or member of the royal household in multiple texts.

Janice R. North