Session Title

Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Dominique Hoche

Organizer Affiliation

West Liberty Univ.

Presider Name

Dominique Hoche

Paper Title 1

Eustache the Monk: Necromancy and Outlaw Politics

Presenter 1 Name

Alexander L. Kaufman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.-Montgomery

Paper Title 2

Malory’s Morgan: Witchcraft, Wisdom, and the Politics of Magical

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew D. O'Donnell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 3

Myth, History, and Prophecy in Royal Genealogies

Presenter 3 Name

Jaclyn Rajsic

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Queen Mary, Univ. of London

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1350

Description

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual “other” in medieval society. Political commentary regarding the occult often tests the limits of scribal activity, and can lead to persecution and/or charges of treason or heresy. Papers in this session explore the dangerous connection between the reception of the occult and political commentary or criticism.

Alison Langdon

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May 12th, 10:00 AM

Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

Schneider 1350

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual “other” in medieval society. Political commentary regarding the occult often tests the limits of scribal activity, and can lead to persecution and/or charges of treason or heresy. Papers in this session explore the dangerous connection between the reception of the occult and political commentary or criticism.

Alison Langdon