Session Title

Anglo-Saxon Elements in Middle English Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Dominique Battles

Organizer Affiliation

Hanover College

Presider Name

Dominique Battles

Paper Title 1

An Old English Riddle Recast in Fourteenth-Century Alliterative Verse

Presenter 1 Name

Brian Cook

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Mississippi

Paper Title 2

British and Saxon in Layamon's Brut: The Case of King Arthur's Arms

Presenter 2 Name

Paul Battles

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Hanover College

Paper Title 3

Gamelyn and Aethelstan: Looking Back and Looking Forward

Presenter 3 Name

Edward L. Risden

Presenter 3 Affiliation

St. Norbert College

Start Date

14-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley I Hadley 101

Description

Recent scholarship has argued for the continuity of Anglo-Saxon literary tradition into the post-Conquest period. Anglo-Saxon narrative elements of character, landscape, battle tactic, architecture, mood, and plot design survive into Middle English literature as late as the fourteenth-century, long after this tradition was believed to have died out. Certain Middle English romances feature a hero characterized largely in Anglo-Saxon terms going up against a villain who bears all the hallmarks of Norman nobility and privilege, contrasting pre and post-Conquest ways of doing things.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon

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May 14th, 10:00 AM

Anglo-Saxon Elements in Middle English Literature

Valley I Hadley 101

Recent scholarship has argued for the continuity of Anglo-Saxon literary tradition into the post-Conquest period. Anglo-Saxon narrative elements of character, landscape, battle tactic, architecture, mood, and plot design survive into Middle English literature as late as the fourteenth-century, long after this tradition was believed to have died out. Certain Middle English romances feature a hero characterized largely in Anglo-Saxon terms going up against a villain who bears all the hallmarks of Norman nobility and privilege, contrasting pre and post-Conquest ways of doing things.

Alison (Ganze) Langdon