Session Title

Ballad of the Lone Medievalist, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Job (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Massachusetts State Universities Medieval Blog

Organizer Name

Kisha G. Tracy

Organizer Affiliation

Fitchburg State Univ.

Presider Name

John P. Sexton

Presider Affiliation

Bridgewater State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

William Rogers

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisiana-Monroe

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas R. Leek

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Emily Leverett

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Methodist Univ.

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Amber Dunai

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.–Central Texas

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Máire Johnson

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Emporia State Univ.

Paper Title 6

Panelists

Presenter 6 Name

Catherine A. Rock, Alexandra Sterling-Hellenbrand

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Stark State College, Appalachian State Univ.

Paper Title 7

Panelists

Presenter 7 Name

Sarah Barott, Rachel Munson

Presenter 7 Affiliation

Bemidji State Univ., Bemidji State Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2016 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

The professional reality is that many of us are at institutions at which we are the "lone medievalist," without colleagues who share our areas of expertise and interest. In most cases, a department will hire only a single medieval specialist – and may be hard-pressed to convince administrations or hiring committees to approve even that one. While the advent of digital technologies has brought us the possibility of closer contact and greater collaboration with our fellow medievalists, our resource access, teaching opportunities, tenure cases, and other facets of our professional lives can be affected by our lack of numbers and by questions about the nature and value of what we do. In order to navigate these realities, we should be drawing on our collective experience.

At the 2015 International Medieval Congress, we hosted a roundtable entitled "The Ballad of the Lone Medievalist." It was exceptionally well-attended and various members of the audience raised issues and suggestions that indicated the conversation had only just begun. For this next roundtable, we would like to extend this conversation. This roundtable, as the title suggests, will collect panelists who can provide suggestions and ideas for professional engagement, curriculum planning, and reappointment and tenure cases as the “lone medievalist” in a department or institution. Our intention is that this roundtable will not be a forum simply for bewailing the state of medieval studies in small institutions. Indeed, we anticipate that it will be an opportunity for camaraderie, suggestions, and advice. We intend it to be very forward-thinking and revitalizing as well as helpful to those of us in these positions. It is also a forum for gathering the contact information in order to build a "lone medievalist" support group.

Kisha Tracy

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 10:00 AM

Ballad of the Lone Medievalist, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Job (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1360

The professional reality is that many of us are at institutions at which we are the "lone medievalist," without colleagues who share our areas of expertise and interest. In most cases, a department will hire only a single medieval specialist – and may be hard-pressed to convince administrations or hiring committees to approve even that one. While the advent of digital technologies has brought us the possibility of closer contact and greater collaboration with our fellow medievalists, our resource access, teaching opportunities, tenure cases, and other facets of our professional lives can be affected by our lack of numbers and by questions about the nature and value of what we do. In order to navigate these realities, we should be drawing on our collective experience.

At the 2015 International Medieval Congress, we hosted a roundtable entitled "The Ballad of the Lone Medievalist." It was exceptionally well-attended and various members of the audience raised issues and suggestions that indicated the conversation had only just begun. For this next roundtable, we would like to extend this conversation. This roundtable, as the title suggests, will collect panelists who can provide suggestions and ideas for professional engagement, curriculum planning, and reappointment and tenure cases as the “lone medievalist” in a department or institution. Our intention is that this roundtable will not be a forum simply for bewailing the state of medieval studies in small institutions. Indeed, we anticipate that it will be an opportunity for camaraderie, suggestions, and advice. We intend it to be very forward-thinking and revitalizing as well as helpful to those of us in these positions. It is also a forum for gathering the contact information in order to build a "lone medievalist" support group.

Kisha Tracy